Layout Image

Archive for Dany Margolies – Page 2

ICE at 24th Street Theatre

Cooper Bates

Cooper Bates

Deborah Klugman – Capital & Main

ICE, Leon Martell’s family friendly play, takes place in 1988 and follows the misadventures of two undocumented immigrants: Chepe (Jesús Castaños-Chima), an avid baseball fan who dreams of making a fortune selling gourmet tacos; and his cousin Nacho (Tony Dúran), whom the beleaguered Chepe summons from Mexico to assist him in setting up his business.

Read more…

Ellen Dostal – Broadway World

Seduced by the notion that, in America, winning is everything, an immigrant loses sight of what is really important in Leon Martell’s world premiere play, ICE. Commissioned by 24th STreet Theatre to commemorate its 20th anniversary, the 65-minute one act highlights the plight of every hopeful soul diligently trying to attain the life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness promised by our founding fathers.
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

The simple but extraordinarily effective stage designs for 24th Street Theatre’s latest offering, “ICE,” immediately inform us of time and place.

A dilapidated truck, a cathedral’s stained-glass window, a quintessentially local street lamp — all these say Los Angeles. A Dodgers announcer excitedly narrating Fernando Valenzuela’s every move via two large television sets with display dials proclaims the 1980s.
Read more…

Now running through June 10

SIGNIFICANT OTHER at the Geffen Playhouse

Chris Whitaker

Chris Whitaker

Jonas Schwartz -  TheaterMania

Joshua Harmon’s Significant Other, now playing at the Geffen Playhouse, explores friendship as a buffer, a support system, and a crutch when navigating the precarious world of love. Often funny, the comedy will remind audiences of their own singlehood, past or present. Unfortunately….
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

What a lovely protagonist Jordan Berman is. Sure, he’s a little too chatty and perhaps a touch too insecure, but he’s honest, caring, bright and perceptive. And he has a delightful sense of humor.
Read more…

Rob Stevens – Haines His Way

“Always the bridesmaid, never the bride.” That seems to be the fate of nebbish-y Jordan Berman (Will Von Vogt) in Joshua Harmon’s very funny and intuitive play, Significant Other, being given a first-rate production at the Geffen Playhouse. Read more…

Katie Buenneke – Stage Raw

Watching Significant Other is something of a sadomasochistic experience for single people. I mean that in the best possible way. Joshua Harmon’s play achieves a singular sense of catharsis, which is no small feat.
Read more…

 

Now running through May 6

ALMOST, MAINE at the Torrance Theatre Company

Miguel Elliot

Miguel Elliot

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

It can be done. A director can take relatively ordinary material and, with the help of adept designers and a committed cast, turn it into extraordinary theater.
Read more…

Now running through April 15

 

JACKIE UNVEILED at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts

Kevin Parry

Kevin Parry

Ellen Dostal – Broadway World

In Act 1 of JACKIE UNVEILED, Tom Dugan‘s new solo play about Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, she repeats a single phrase over and over. “I’m no good alone.” The chain smoking, alcohol indulging former first lady has just learned that her brother-in-law (and secret lover) Bobby Kennedy has been assassinated. Now, in the wee hours of the morning, she is distraught.
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

In the 1960s, only realists and Republicans could possibly think first lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy was not perfect. She was willowy, whispery, well-spoken. She had chic taste, financial comfort, a handsome husband. And he and she occupied the White House.
Read more…

Now running through March 18

THE FLYING LOVERS OF VITEBSK at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts

a LWHJ2AFIFJAOLKW34VDL76PDVA

Steve Tanner

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Sometimes it’s fun to sashay into a theater cold, without the slightest notion of what you’re in for. But before seeing “The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk,” the Kneehigh Theatre production now at the Wallis in Beverly Hills, you might want to refresh your memory of the art of Marc Chagall.
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. And that’s particularly true if you’re a somewhat educated and somewhat well-read audience member.
Read more…

Now running through March 11

NICE FISH at the Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles

fish4

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

“Think of the prose poem as the box, perhaps the lunch box dad brought home at night,” writes down-to-earth poet Louis Jenkins in the program notes to Nice Fish, a unique (and to my mind brilliant) collaborative work by Jenkins and renowned performer Mark Rylance.
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

What do we hope for when we head out to the theater? Even if it’s entertainment, or meaning, our deepest purpose is elusive.
Read more…

Now running through March 25

IRONBOUND at the Geffen Playhouse

Christ Whitaker

Chris Whitaker

Erin Conley – On Stage & Screen

At what point in life must you be willing to sacrifice happiness for survival? Ironbound, a play by Martyna Majok currently in its west coast premiere at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles, tells the story of Darja (Marin Ireland), a Polish immigrant struggling to build a life for herself in New Jersey.
Read more…

Terry Morgan  -  Stage Raw

In my experience, when a production is of mixed or bad quality, the acting is rarely to blame. Occasionally an ill-judged performance will mar a fine piece of writing, but it is much more common to watch a talented ensemble struggle with an undercooked play. So it is with Martyna Majok’s Ironbound….
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

We should empathize with Darja. She’s an immigrant struggling to wrap her mouth around English, both its syntax and pronunciation. She works two jobs, when they’re available. She constantly worries about her son, who needs a stay in rehab that she can’t afford, even if she could find him these days. Indeed, she can’t find any good man who will stay around and treasure her.
Read more…

Deborah Klugman – Capital & Main

In American theater, as in life, not all voices receive equal airtime — one reason why Martyna Majok’s pitch-black dramedy about a Polish-born factory worker-slash-cleaning lady is so poignant and arresting.
Read more…

Jonas Schwartz -  TheaterMania

Darja, the lonely, unfulfilled antihero of Ironbound, at the Geffen Playhouse, grants actor Marin Ireland a showcase for her vast talents. In lesser hands, Darja, a woman who seems to live only to survive, is a character that could turn off audiences, but Ireland finds Darja’s unsinkable core and hooks us along with it.
Read more…

Now running through March 4

PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE at the Norris Theatre

Ed Krieger

Ed Krieger

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

As we count the years, or lately the days, of the 21st century, what are we taking pride in? Are we already viewing the 20th century with nostalgia? And regret?
Read more…

Now running through February 4

CHARLEY’S AUNT at Torrance Theatre Company

Miguel Elliot

Miguel Elliot

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

How ironic that the nation that once banned women from acting on the stage found it hilarious a few centuries later to see a man onstage in a woman’s dress. But irony is a large part of British humor.
Read more…

Now running through February 18

 

SHAKESPEARE HIS WIFE AND THE DOG at the Broad Stage

1499718680_DSC_0253

Ellen Dostal – Broadway World

It takes an awfully long time to get to the point in Philip Whitchurch’s original one act play directed by Julia St. John. Set during a fictional night in the lives of William Shakespeare (played by Whitchurch) and his wife Anne (Sally Edwards) at their home in Stratford-upon-Avon, the story reveals a couple in their later years, bickering but still clearly in love…
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

“You cannot talk without it being puns or snatches of your plays,” William Shakespeare’s wife complains in “Shakespeare his wife and the dog.” The audience might feel likewise.

But in this 65-minute work by Philip Whitchurch, ending Sunday at the Broad Stage, when these two get down to the troubles ordinary humans face — illness, lovelessness — we feel every bit of their pain.
Read more…

Now running through January 28

PICK OF THE VINE at Little Fish Theatre

lfish

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

Little Fish Theater’s annual short-play festival “Pick of the Vine” this year features nine plays touching on the theme “Secrets We Keep.”

Bringing meaning and polish to the plays are a uniformly firm feel even though various directors are involved, crisp designs and solid acting.
Read more…

Now running through February 17

FREUD’S LAST SESSION at the Odyssey Theatre

(Photo by Enci Box)

(Photo by Enci Box)

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

George Bernard Shaw once observed that it is useless to argue with a clergyman because his livelihood depends on his not changing his mind. But the remark could equally well be applied to anyone whose career depends on defending and maintaining a particular point of view —and that could be said of both the protagonists in Mark St. Germain’s play.
Read more…

Rob Stevens – Haines His Way

Dr. Sigmund Freud was born to Jewish parents in the Austrian Empire in the mid-19th Century. He came to regard the monotheistic God as an illusion based on the infantile emotional need for a powerful, supernatural pater familias. He believed that in modern times (early 20th Century) religion could be set aside in favor of reason and science.
Read more…

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

Philosophers, theologians, believers and nonbelievers from a broad spectrum of cultures and faiths have been arguing about God’s existence for centuries. In Freud’s Last Session, playwright Mark St. Germain crystallizes the essence of the debate, creating a fictional encounter between Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis and a famous skeptic, and Irish-born C.S.
Lewis, a scholar, novelist and devout Christian…
Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

Freud! Lewis! Rumble in the library!

More or less.

Mark St. Germain’s two-character play, “Freud’s Last Session,” at the Odyssey through March 4, doesn’t rise to fisticuffs. But his imagined debate between the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, and author and newly converted Anglican, C.S. Lewis, is as contentious as a heavyweight fight.
Read more…

Now running through March 4