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Archive for Deborah Klugman

STILL LIFE at Rogue Machine at The Met

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

Though it aspires to be profound, Alexander Dinelaris’s’ aptly titled Still Life can’t transcend its commonplace dialogue or the limitations of an inadequately conceived central character.   Read more…

Now running through April 23

MARRIED PEOPLE: A COMEDY at the Zephyr Theatre

(Photo by Sascha Knopf)

(Photo by Sascha Knopf)

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

As its title implies, Married People: A Comedy concerns the ups and downs of two married couples. Written by Steve Shaffer and Mark Schiff, both long-time standup comics, it’s less a play than a compilation of sitcom shtick with a sizable sprinkling of borscht-belt humor.    Read more…

Now running through April 2

GOOD GRIEF at the Kirk Douglas Theatre

Photo by Craig Schwartz

Photo by Craig Schwartz

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Ngozi Anyanwu stars in the first play she wrote herself, “Good Grief,” in its world premiere at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City. She plays Nkechi, a medical-school dropout who has returned to her childhood home in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, after the accidental death of a friend plunges her into intense mourning that, family and friends suggest, is becoming self-indulgent. Read more…

Erin Conley – OnStage

“Tell me a story. Something that’s true, something that’s false, something that seems familiar. Something that sounds like it could be true.” This line really encapsulates the simultaneously realistic and dreamlike feeling of Good Grief, a world premiere play written by and starring Ngozi Anyanwu, now playing at Center Theatre Group’s Kirk Douglas Theatre.Read more…

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

In the preface to her extraordinarily eloquent play Good Grief, Ngozi Anyanwu tells us that it takes place between 1992 and 2005 in Bensalem, Pennsylvania — and also “at the beginning of time … and the future.”  Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

Our pasts cannot be changed. We can try to relive them, but in reality all we store in our memories is our reactions to them. These ideas thread through “Good Grief,” …… Read more…

Now running through March 26

 

COLLECTIVE RAGE at The Theatre at Boston Court

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Photo by Ed Kreiger

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

Collective Rage, whose poster features a gal with soft eyes, a flexed bicep and a clenched fist, is subtitled “a play in 5 boops” because all five characters are named Betty Boop, after the cartoon figure conceived by Max Fleischer in 1930. Read more…

Frances Baum Nicholson – The Daily Breeze

If a play intends to use cultural references in the course of its work, it probably makes sense to be sure that the audience will catch a clue as to what those references are. Read more…

Now running through March 19

CANNIBALS ALONE at The Belfry Stage, Upstairs at the Crown

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Photo by Lonni Silverman

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

Steph Deferie’s Cannibals Alone bears the surface markings of a timely dystopian drama, with an all-female cast of tough characters you wouldn’t want to mess with. The feminist angle is commendable; otherwise, the play lacks cogency and reeks of bad TV melodrama of the sci-fi variety. Read more…

Now running through March 5

 

LYRICS FROM LOCKDOWN at the ACTORS GANG

LYRICS FROM LOCKDOWN - 2

Deborah Klugman – Capital & Main

Somewhere in the middle of Bryonn Bain’s soulful one-of-a-kind show, the playwright/poet/performer recounts an interview between himself and a public defender. Their talk takes place in an interrogation room in a New York City police precinct, where Bain has been wrongly detained on criminal charges. The Nuyorican Grand Slam Poetry champion and teacher of incarcerated youth explains to the legal aid attorney that the situation at hand is a case of mistaken identity…Read more…

Now running through February 26

EVERY BRILLIANT THING at the Edye at the Broad

Photo by Michaela Bodlovic

Photo by Michaela Bodlovic

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

Jonny Donahoe, a wonderful storyteller, is so personal and persuasive that one assumes, or at least I did, that the solo show he performs at the Edye at the Broad is an autobiographical play. But it isn’t. Every Brilliant Thing was initially written by Duncan Macmillan….Read more…

Now running through February 12

KING HEDLEY II at the Matrix Theatre

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Photo by Oliver Bokelberg

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

August Wilson’s King Hedley II takes place in the 1980s when Reaganomics, and the notion that wealth trickles down from the rich to the poor, was the hypothetical order of the day. The reality, of course, is that no such trickling took place; the poor, black and white, grew poorer than ever, a circumstance we see in the struggle of Wilson’s title character to earn a living for himself and his family, and to garner, against odds, some measure of self-respect.    Read more…

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

This play by the late August Wilson is part of his 10-play series about the black experience in each of the decades of the 20th century. This one is set in the 1980s. The title character, King Hedley II (Esau Pritchett), is a proud but thwarted black man, whose face is bisected by a livid scar, the result of a razor attack.   Read more…

Now running through February 12

FELLOWSHIP at Cornerstone Theatre Company

Photo by Brian Biery

Photo by Brian Biery

Deborah Klugman – Capital & Main

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines fellowship in various ways: as companionship, as a community of interest or experience, as a company of equals or friends, among others. These definitions serve as prologue to Julie Marie Myatt’s immersive stage play, fellowship: a play for volunteers……… Read more…

Now running through February 12

ZANNA DON’T! at Chromolume Theatre at the Attic

Photo by Tyler Vess

Photo by Tyler Vess

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

There’s a lot of singing about love in Tim Acito’s musical fantasy, Zanna, Don’t! which is set in a high school in the Midwest (Heartsville High), where homosexuality is the norm and being hetero prompts wrinkled noses and grossed-out looks. Read more…

Now running through February 5

THE FOUND DOG RIVER DANCE at the Atwater Village Theatre

Photo by Darrett Sanders

Photo by Darrett Sanders

Erin Conley – On Stage & Screen

In the opening scene of The Found Dog Ribbon Dance, a world premiere play by Dominic Finocchiaro currently being presented by the Echo Theater Company, a man wearing a Lucha mask uses a webcam to record himself dancing, with ribbons, of course, to “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” by Whitney Houston. Read more…

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

This production of Dominic Finocchiaro’s The Found Dog River Dance wants to be wry and whimsical and deeply revelatory, but succeeds only fractionally, especially with the revelatory part.

Read more…

Now running through February 26

BEE-LUTHER-HATCHEE at the Sierra Madre Playhouse

Photo by Gina Long

Photo by Gina Long

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

In 1985 police dropped a bomb on a predominantly black middle-class neighborhood in Philadelphia. They were targeting MOVE, a strange radical group known for staging vociferous profanity-laden demonstrations against the Establishment. Read more…

Now running through February 18