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Archive for John Kander

CABARET at La Mirada Theatre

Photo by Jason Niedle

Photo by Jason Niedle

Jonas Schwartz -  TheaterMania

Cabaret has undergone much alteration from Harold Prince’s original 1966 Broadway production. In 1972, wunderkind Bob Fosse revamped the story line for the film version, commissioning the composer John Kander and lyricist Fred Ebb to write new songs, such as “Mein Herr,” “Money,” and the pair’s trunk song “Maybe This Time.”

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Rob Stevens – Haines His Way

John Kander/Fred Ebb/Joe Masteroff’s Cabaret premiered in 1966 at the height of America’s civil rights struggle and producer/director Hal Prince shaped the musical “to show how racism can happen here” even though the action of the script was set in early 1930s as the Nazi Party rose to power in Germany and began the racial cleansing of its Jewish population.
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Ellen Dostal – Musicals in L.A.

Even if all they do is take the expected route, most productions of Kander & Ebb’s Cabaret are effective. Emphasize the sex and decadence rampant in Berlin during the end of the Weimar era as Hitler was coming into power and the show predictably succeeds in driving home its point – that distractions like the Kit Kat Klub helped people ignore what was happening politically until it was too late.
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Now running through February 11

The Scottsboro Boys at the Ahmanson Theatre

Scottsboro Boys

THE SCOTTSBORO BOYSmusic and lyrics by John Kander and Fred Ebb, book by David Thompson

Les Spindle – Edge Los Angeles

The 2010 musical “The Scottsboro Boys” now in its L.A. premiere, is among the most innovative and thrilling shows to have graced Broadway in recent years, justifiably earning 12 Tony nominations. Yet it lost all of those Tony bids in a year when “The Book of Mormon” proved to be an undefeatable juggernaut.
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Photo by Craig Schwartz

Photo by Craig Schwartz

Dany Margolies – ArtsInLA

This production opens with a woman sitting on a bus bench, holding a pastry box. The aroma from the box seems to give her a Proustian memory. Suddenly, a troupe charges through Ahmanson Theatre, heads for the stage, and begins to tell the tale of the Scottsboro boys. The story of the real-life pretense at justice for nine Southern black teens in the 1930s unfolds, but not in documentary form.
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