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Archive for Matrix Theatre – Page 2

THE END OF IT at the Matrix Theatre

Neal Weaver – LA Weekly

Breaking up is hard to do, particularly if you’re embedded in a 20-year marriage. That’s the not terribly surprising message of Paul Coates’ play, illustrated by three couples: one straight (Kelly Coffield Park and playwright Coates), one gay (David Youse and William Franklin Barker) and one lesbian (Ferrell Marshall and Wendy Radford). Read more…

Dany Margolies  -  Arts In LA

How much should theater resemble real life, and how much can it do so? Playwright Paul Coates hits a big nail on the head in this look at the human heart. His play clearly and cleverly reveals the universality of love and the pain of divorce. But it also spotlights the artificialities, albeit long-accepted ones, of theater. Read more...

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

At the beginning of Paul Coates‘ new play, The End of It, currently playing at the Matrix Theatre, a long-married heterosexual couple living in Los Angeles, Joanna and Drew (Kelly Coffield Park and Coates), are recovering from a party they’ve just thrown. As any number of sociologists and dramatists from Erving Goffman to Samuel Beckett will tell you, it’s not just sex or common interests that hold couples together. It’s the repartee.
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Now running through October 20.

 

THE END OF IT at the Matrix Theatre

Neal Weaver – LA Weekly

Breaking up is hard to do, particularly if you’re embedded in a 20-year marriage. That’s the not terribly surprising message of Paul Coates’ play, illustrated by three couples: one straight (Kelly Coffield Park and playwright Coates), one gay (David Youse and William Franklin Barker) and one lesbian (Ferrell Marshall and Wendy Radford).
Read more…

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

Now running through October 20.

We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia Formerly Known As South-West Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884–1915 at the Matrix Theatre

Photo by Jillian Armanente

Photo by Jillian Armanente

 

Bob Verini – ArtsInLA

 

If you revel in fine actors’ pushing the envelope of what performance can do, or have an interest in investigating important historical experience via theatrical means, this ungainly-named but unforgettable work is *the* production of the summer, just as Son of Semele’s recently closed Our Class was *the* production of the spring. In both, a splendidly unified ensemble, masterfully directed, shape-shifts among multiple roles to tackle, head-on, the 20th century’s legacy of dread.
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Terry Morgan – LAist

 

One of the truisms of theatre is that one doesn’t need a lot of money to do it right; you just require creativity and talent. The latest example of this is a new show with a very long title: We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About The Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From The German Sudwestafrika, Between The Years 1884-1915. The west coast premiere of Jackie Sibblies Drury’s play at the Matrix Theatre is a dazzling tour de force of brilliant writing, acting and direction, and, despite the serious subject matter, it’s frequently hilarious.
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