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Archive for Robert Gossett

THE ROYALE at the Kirk Douglas Theatre

Photo by Craig Schwartz.

Photo by Craig Schwartz.

 

 

THE ROYALE by Marco Ramirez.

 

Pauline Adamek – ArtsBeatLA

A ferocious cast giving their all in a powerful play—Marco Ramirez’ The Royale is a tremendously satisfying evening of theater, now playing at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. Set in the world of boxing during the early 1900s, we meet a tough young fighter Jay “The Sport” Jackson (David St. Louis). He’s battled his way to the top of his game, having earned the title of black Heavyweight champion. But he feels he deserves the honor of undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, and to win that crown, he needs to face off against the reigning white heavyweight champion—an unheard of event in this racially divided era.
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Dany Margolies – ArtsInLA

Oh, how playwrights have tried to explain why we behave the way we do. Marco Ramirez takes his audience on that exploration in this world premiere. And even though a play about boxing might not sound universal enough, this one is tremendously satisfying in its intellectual and emotional study of the psychology of sports and racism.
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Fraternity, Ebony Repertory Theatre

Photo by Craig Schwartz.

 

Fraternity by Jeff Stetson.

 

Pauline Adamek – LA Weekly

Jeff Stetson’s all-male political drama Fraternity, written 25 years ago, has a prescient power to it. Set in Birmingham, Ala., the storyline presents a prosperous group of black men, members of a private gentleman’s club, and the tragic history that shaped each of their lives. A shocking bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in their hometown resulted in the death of four little black girls, accelerating the civil rights movement. Read more…

 

 

Bob Verini – Variety

The title of Ebony Repertory’s latest offering, Fraternity, doesn’t just refer to the exclusive men’s club at which Birmingham’s fat cats of color wheel and deal while the Reagan boom years wind down. It also conjures up the brotherhood ideal to which those same men once swore allegiance, back when they were desegregating lunch counters and battling for the common good. Jeff Stetson’s sprawling, sometimes awkward, always provocative work tackles the great subject of generational neglect.  Read more…

 

Melinda Schupmann – ArtsInLA.com

Real-life events often beget theatrical productions that bring to light the larger picture surrounding those happenings. In playwright Jeff Stetson’s script, the terrorist bombing of a Birmingham, Ala., Baptist church in which four young girls died figures in a complex story about politics and race.   Read more…