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Archive for Tennessee Williams

THE GLASS MENAGERIE at A Noise Within

Craig Schwartz

Craig Schwartz

Dany Margolies – The Daily News

If you had a perfectly happy childhood with ideal parents, good for you. Tennessee Williams did not, and this led to some of literature’s most-affecting, most-enduring plays.

Many in his audiences didn’t, either, and that’s why we keep coming back to his classics, particularly “The Glass Menagerie.” Indeed, its title refers to a collection of tiny toy animals on display but perhaps also to the glassiest of menageries: our families.
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Frances Baum Nicholson –The Stage Struck Review

One of the seminal works of American theatrical literature is Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie,” the play which vaulted him to fame. It was in my high school English textbook, in the equivalent for that preliminary English course everyone has to take in college, and one of the great plays studied in my theater lit course.
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Rob Stevens – Haines His Way

When a group of theatre critics discuss the greatest American playwrights, three names are usually mentioned the most—Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams.
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Now running through April 26

 

BABY DOLL at the Fountain Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

As a film, Baby Doll was a little too racy for segments of America when it premiered in 1956. Its poster featured a scantily clad (by that era’s standards) young woman in a slip, curled up in a crib, sucking her thumb. Directed by Elia Kazan from a screenplay by Tennessee Williams (based on two of his stage plays), the movie passed muster with the industry’s regulators but was condemned by the Legion of Decency……Read more…

Now running through September 25

KINGDOM OF EARTH at the Odyssey Theatre

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

No doubt avid theatergoers and especially those fascinated by playwright Tennessee Williams will have already bought tickets to his rarely produced “Kingdom of Earth,” running at West Los Angeles’ Odyssey Theatre. Read more…

Now running through August 14

 

ECCENTRICITIES OF A NIGHTINGALE at Pacific Resident Theatre

Photo by Vitor Martins

Photo by Vitor Martins

Terry Morgan  -  Stage Raw

Eccentricities of a Nightingale was Tennessee Williams’ 1951 rewrite of his earlier Summer and Smoke. It was supposedly his preferred version of the story, and one can see why. The main character of Alma is more clearly delineated, and the drama springs more from her choices than from fate. The current production at Pacific Resident Theater benefits from Dana Jackson’s sensitive direction and a knockout lead performance. Read more…

David C. Nichols – LA Times

With “The Eccentricities of a Nightingale,” Tennessee Williams’ 1951 revision of his earlier play “Summer and Smoke,” Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice ends its 30th anniversary season on a quietly remarkable note. Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

Tennessee Williams’ play, “The Eccentricities of a Nightingale,” has been said to be about good and evil, illusion and reality.    Read more…

Now running through August 14

SUMMER AND SMOKE at the Actors Co-op

Photo by Lindsay Schnebly

Photo by Lindsay Schnebly

David C. Nichols – LA Times

Summer and Smoke” may stand a little higher in the Tennessee Williams canon after you see an exceptional Actors Co-op revival of the 1947 drama, one of the best offerings in the company’s storied history.   Read more…

Les Spindle –  Frontiers L.A.

Tennessee Williams’ sultry and thought-provoking 1947 drama, strongly associated with Geraldine Page’s unforgettable lead performances on stage and screen, is also known as Eccentricities of a Nightingale, the author’s 1964 revision.

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Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

Playwright Tennessee Williams was always an intensely personal writer, verging on the obsessive in his preoccupation with certain themes, locales, and character types. But earlier in his career, his obsessions were kept in control, and he had a real desire to make his work accessible to the larger audience. Read more…

Now running through April 17

 

VIEUX CARRE at the Historic Noho Arts Center

Vieux Carre Image

(Photo by Nardeep Khurmi)

Bob Verini  -   Stage Raw

In the vast scheme of Tennessee Williams’ long career, the 1978 Vieux Carré stands as one of his lesser plays, derivative and ill-shaped. Among the works of his final two decades, however, it’s one which can still credibly command a stage if given a vigorous and mature production.   Read more…

David C. Nichols – LA Times

The singular theatrical voice of Tennessee Williams pulsates through “Vieux Carré” at the Lankershim Arts Center in North Hollywood.

Although this resourceful Coeurage Theatre Company production of Williams’ kaleidoscopic memory play doesn’t resolve the property’s liabilities, it’s a noble and inventively executed effort. Read more…

Now running through March 12

THE GLASS MENAGERIE at Greenway Court

Photo by Alfred Collar

Photo by Alfred Collar

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

This play, which provided Tennessee Williams with the first great success in his spectacular but ultimately blighted career, is astonishingly rich, simple, and forthright. That it requires only four actors and a single set has deluded many actors and directors to think it is an easy play to do. But it requires a delicate touch, and a particularly gifted director and cast to release its magic.  Read more…

Now running through June 14.

THE GLASS MENAGERIE at the Renegade Theatre

Photo by Theodora Greece

Photo by Theodora Greece

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

The published text of Tennessee Williams’ play is rife with stage directions insisting that it’s not a realistic play, but its production history suggests that Williams didn’t trust his own creation. When it’s performed with honesty and simplicity, as it is here, debates about realism vs. memory seem merely academic. Read more…

Now running through May 17.

 

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE at the Lonny Chapman Theatre

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Photo by Drina Durazo

Terry Morgan – Stage Raw

The current production of Tennessee Williams’s classic A Streetcar Named Desire by The Group Rep at the Lonny Chapman Theatre is a pleasant surprise, a robust take on the material that features a strong ensemble, an outstanding Blanche, and smart direction that brings the material to vibrant life. Read more…

Now playing through September 7.