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Archive for Theresa Rebeck

THE UNDERSTUDY at Studio Stage

Photo  by Bryan Dechart

Photo by Bryan Dechart

Myron Meisel – Stage Raw

Coming a generation earlier than Sheila Callaghan, Theresa Rebeck (Mauritius, Seminar) mapped out a career course for many like her to model. Read more…

Now running through April 3

Seminar, Center Theatre Group/Ahmanson Theatre

Photo by: Craig Schwartz

 

Seminar by Theresa Rebeck.

 

Hoyt Hilsman – The Huffington Post

Plays about writers and writing present major challenges for both audiences and playwrights. Because writing is such an internal process, full of grinding frustration and occasional exhilaration, it is a tough subject to portray on stage. Playwright and film/TV writer Theresa Rebeck makes a valiant but flawed assault on the subject in her play Seminar, which ran last year for six months on Broadway and recently opened at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles.   Read more…

 

Pauline Adamek – ArtsBeatLA

Playwright and screenwriter for film and TV Theresa Rebeck has a brilliant ear for realistic and witty dialogue and – more importantly – an eagle eye for observing the dynamics of modern relationships. Her insight, combined with her satirical edge, makes for some highly entertaining comedies and dramedies. She’s not always successful; a recent production of Our House had issues with a wavering tone. But when you settle into your seat to experience one of her plays, there’s no doubt you will be entertained, provoked and hopefully amused. This newest production, Seminar, does all that and more. Read more…

 

Steven Leigh Morris – LA Weekly

I’m not sure what happened to Theresa Rebeck’s Seminar at the Ahmanson. In New York, on Broadway, with Alan Rickman as the sadistic guru of a high-end workshop for aspiring scribes, there emerged the portrait of a world-weary, sexually precocious, washed-up, literary “leader” of waiting-to-be-abused acolytes. It was a view of a demonic world fueled by jealousy and bitterness containing a single moment of generosity, redemption and purpose — what Ian would have called “divine.”   Read more…