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Archive for Zephyr Theatre

MARRIED PEOPLE: A COMEDY at the Zephyr Theatre

(Photo by Sascha Knopf)

(Photo by Sascha Knopf)

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

As its title implies, Married People: A Comedy concerns the ups and downs of two married couples. Written by Steve Shaffer and Mark Schiff, both long-time standup comics, it’s less a play than a compilation of sitcom shtick with a sizable sprinkling of borscht-belt humor.    Read more…

Now running through April 2

THE LAST VIG at the Zephyr Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Katie Buenneke – Stage Raw

The Last Vig is billed as a show starring Burt Young, the Academy Award-nominated actor who played Paulie in the Rocky series. Unfortunately, Young’s performance is one of many big problems in the show, which plays through February 19 at the Zephyr Theatre. Read more…

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

Mobsters, especially Italian ones, are as much a part of American folklore as cowboys. Writer/director David Varriale capitalizes on our fascination with them in this character-driven dramedy:    Read more…

Now running through February 19

GARDEL’S TANGO at the Zephyr Theatre

Photo by Big White Bazooka Photography

Photo by Big White Bazooka Photography

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

Carlos Gardel was born Charles Gardès in France to an unwed mother who emigrated to Argentina shortly after his birth. He grew up in a working class neighborhood in Buenos Aires, later becoming an international celebrity famous for his baritone voice, his Latin-lover looks and his heart-fluttering female fans. Read more…

Now running through December 18

ALTMAN’S LAST STAND at the Zephyr Theatre

(Photo by Ellen Giamportone)

(Photo by Ellen Giamportone)

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

Franz Altman (Michael Laskin), the protagonist of playwright Charles Dennis’s deft solo drama, is an elderly Viennese Jew born just before the turn of the 20th century. Now nearly 100 years old, he owns a second-hand store called King Solomon’s Treasures, located in mid-town Manhattan, circa 1990. Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Franz Altman, the fictional New York City junk-shop proprietor in Charles Dennis’ play “Altman’s Last Stand” now at Zephyr Theatre, may be 90 years old, but he’s in no hurry to retire. In fact, he’s recently become a celebrity, interviewed on “60 Minutes” for refusing to sell his store, King Solomon’s Treasure, to high-rise developers.   Read more…

Now running through March 13

THE HOUSE OF YES at the Zephyr Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

David C. Nichols – LA Times

Family dysfunction, that age-old staple of the dramatic canon, permeates the walking wounded that populate “The House of Yes” in a respectable, albeit still-gelling 25th anniversary revival at the Zephyr. Read more…

Now running through June 14.

FINDING NICK at the Zephr Theatre

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Paul Birchall – Stage and Cinema

In his solo show, playwright Nicholas Guest describes his life and travels around the world.  He’s accompanied by Hillary Smith on the cello and by Tony Carafone on the guitar (in the play, not his travels) – and they turn out to be a helpful pair, too, because Guest intersperses his anecdotes and stories with songs.    Read more..

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

Nicholas Guest’s solo show seems like a live audition tape: it shows off his handsome appearance, his versatility, his knack for quick character sketches, his talent for dialects, and his easy-going, seemingly effortless way with a song. Only dramaturgy goes missing.

Read more…

Now running through March 27.

DIRTY at the Zephyr Theatre

Photo by Erica Brown

Photo by Erica Brown

Bob Verini -   Arts In LA

First things first: Dirty is by no means dirty, at least insofar as habitues of Melrose Avenue’s Zephyr Theatre might expect. That particular venue has hosted more than its share of full-frontal nudity and simulated sex acts over the years. Read more…

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

In its rather earnest way, Andrew Hinderaker’s Dirty calls into question how the word “obscene” often applies to pornography but not to, say, mergers and acquisitions. In fact, the play strongly implies that sex is a kind of merger and acquisition, so why not profit from it? Read more…

Now running through December 21.

LOW HANGING FRUIT at the Zephyr Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

The plight of homeless women veterans is a story that needs to be told, not once but many times. In Low Hanging Fruit, playwright Robin Bradford makes that story her aim, but her script has been rushed to the stage too soon. Read more…

Now running  through October 26.

THE PAIN AND THE ITCH at the Zephyr Theatre

PainItch

Terry Morgan – LAist

Having seen a couple of plays written by Bruce Norris, (Clybourne Park and The Parallelogram) I’m beginning to detect a theme in his writing. He seems to find the purportedly liberal beliefs of certain rich white people worthy of ridicule, specifically convictions of a “politically correct” strain. Nowhere is this clearer than in his play The Pain And The Itch, where most of the characters are smug and self-deluded, almost to the point of caricature. Nonetheless, his writing is sharp and witty, and the new production of the show at the Zephyr Theatre is outstanding.
Read more…

Dany Margolies  -  ArtsInLA

Playwright Bruce Norris doesn’t provide his audience with comfort and hope. Apparently he’d rather we think, squirm, even cringe. So his plays are not for the faint of heart. Then again, neither is life.
The Pain and the Itch is his 2004 opus….

Read more…

 

Now running through December 1.

THE BOOMERANG EFFECT at the Zephyr Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Les Spindle – Frontiers

Veteran playwright-screenwriter-director Del Shores (Sordid Lives, Yellow) dons a producer’s hat for an encore production of Matthew Leavitt’s raucous sex comedy, The Boomerang Effect. This episodic play, charting the subtly interrelated lives of five couples in five separate bedrooms, premiered at the Odyssey Theatre in April 2012.  Read more

Now running through July 27.