Layout Image

Archive for Steven Leigh Morris – Page 2

WILL L.A. ACTORS SUE THEIR UNION?

broadus

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

We haven’t been treated fairly, and everybody knows it, says actress Maria Gobetti.

She’s objecting to the union’s elimination of L.A.’s 99-Seat Theater Plan, which, for the uninitiated, was in effect for a quarter century and permitted union actors to work in theaters of up to 99-seats in L.A. County for token stipends. Read more…

 

WAR AND PEACE. REBECCA METZ, ON ACTORS’ EQUITY ASSOCIATION AND ITS PLAN FOR L.A.

Rebecca-Metz

Steven Leigh Morris – @ This Stage magazine

Steven Leigh Morris: Things have gone very quiet in the past couple of months. You’d almost think that nothing is happening.

Rebecca Metz: There’s a lot of anger, in the older generation particularly. Personally, I can’t function holding that much anger. My goal is to get the union to see that we’re reasonable, and for us to see that they’re reasonable. Two weeks ago, [I was in a meeting] with Gail Gabler, Mary McColl [and others]. I have been having a text conversation with Mary McColl, we’ve had a good, civil conversation. She said, “Kate and I are going to be in town, I want you to choose six people and [we can] have a conversation.”  Read more…

One-Person Shows Are Too Stuck in Reality. Sometimes They Should Make Things Up

st_jude_photo5

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

A solo show’s a little show where people talk about their life,

“Like battling the bottle. Or slicing themselves with a knife,

“They tell their tale with wigs or props, with easels to communicate,

“Like being gay or being bi or being trans or being straight!

Read more…

HOLLYWOOD FRINGE FESTIVAL at various locations

Photo by Shing Yin Khor

Photo by Shing Yin Khor

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

One of the Hollywood Fringe Festival’s many venues is an old van laden with graffiti and suitcases, with shrinelike decorations in the back. The vehicle, like the show that occurs within and around it, is called Hamlet-Mobile, a notion written and directed by Lauren Ludwig and presented by a company named the Moving Shadow. Read more…

Now running through June 28.

A NEW SCHEME TO HAVE SHOWS PAY $150 FOR A REVIEW WILL HURT L.A. THEATER

drama_critic_parking_only_neon_light_sign

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

So you’re a theater having a hard time getting audiences. A new plan under way by the ever-tempestuous L.A.-based theater website Bitter Lemons allows you to pay the website directly for a published review, with the reviewer receiving the lion’s share of that payment — no guarantee of a good review, and you can’t select the reviewer, but it’s at least a guarantee of a review by “an experienced critic.” It’s something like when playwrights or screenwriters pay an expert to read their drafts, or a theater pays a dramaturg or script doctor — the major difference being that Bitter Lemons’ “initiative” is not just a private exchange, it’s a public one that involves readers and audiences. So what’s the problem? Read more…

THE HOMECOMING at Pacific Residents Theatre

HMC

Photo by Ashley Boxler

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

“Why don’t you shut up, you daft prat?” says Lenny (Jason Downs, resembling young Malcolm McDowell) to his father, Max (Jude Ciccolella), in Guillermo Cienfuegos’ top-flight revival of Harold Pinter’s 1965 comedy The Homecoming at Pacific Resident Theatre. Read more…

Now running through July 26.

THIS IS A MAN’S WORLD at the Los Angeles Theatre Center

Photo by Stephen Mihalek

Photo by Stephen Miihalek

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

At 60 years old, the spry, lean, silver-haired Sal Lopez could well be Puck’s dad. And it could be argued that Lopez’s picaresque autobiographical one-man show, This Is a Man’s World at Los Angeles Theatre Center, is a memory play. That’s because it opens with Lopez screaming on a hospital bed wondering what he’s doing there. Read more…

Bob Verini –  Stage Raw

This Is a Man’s World, at the L.A. Theatre Center, begins with actor/writer Sal Lopez rearing up on a hospital bed to cry out in confused panic, “How did I get here? How did I get here?” Which, when you come to think of it, can hardly be bettered as a line kicking off an evening of personal reminiscence. Read more…

Now running through June 21.

 

ENRON at the Lex Theatre

Photo by Joanna Strapp

Photo by Joanna Strapp

 Bob Verini – Stage Raw

Most people’s command of international finance and investment, I think it’s fair to say, probably cuts not much deeper than the “Money makes the world go around” lyrics from Cabaret. Yet in telling the sorry true-life saga of the titular Houston energy giant and its catastrophic demise, Lucy Prebble’s Enron coolly takes for granted our ability to take in, not just the gist of what went down in October 2001, but its intricate details as well.  Read more…

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

Near the conclusion of Lucy Prebble’s Enron, a docudrama animated with puppets and choreography about the fabled demise of the $111 billion Houston energy trading company (trumpeted by Forbes for six consecutive years as a model of corporate ingenuity), the firm’s now-convicted president, Jeffrey Skilling (Skip Pipo), defiantly rationalizes his actions. Read more…

Les Spindle –  Frontiers L.A.

Life is somewhat of a cabaret as well as a smoking cauldron of corporate greed and fiscal catastrophe in Lucy Prebble’s sardonic 2010 British play, now in its L.A. premiere.  Read more…

Jonas Schwartz -  Arts In LA

The political satire Enron spells out how one of the largest energy companies in the world toppled in 2001 due to accounting fraud. Employing musical comedy techniques and puppets, writer Lucy Prebble and director August Viverito mix a spoonful of sugar into repulsive subject matter. Read more…

 Now running through June 28.

L.A. JOURNEY at Casa 0101

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Steven Leigh Morris – LA Weekly

…..Money also dictates the behavior of the multitudinous characters in An L.A. Journey, the difference being that most of them don’t have much of it to invest or to lose. Read more…

Now running through June 7.

 

63 TRILLION at the Odyssey Theatre

66TrillionKrieger

Terry Morgan  -  Stage Raw

John Bunzel’s new play is reminiscent of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, but more comedic in intent. The story takes place in the milieu of “wealth management” during a fictional financial catastrophe as the various characters attempt to screw each other over or profit from the chaos. Read more…

Steven Leigh Morris – LA Weekly

For a snapshot of our bifurcated city through the lens of our 99-seat theater, see John Bunzel’s money management farce 63 Trillion, presented by the New American Theatre at the Westside’s Odyssey Theatre, and then head east to Boyle Heights to watch Emmanuel Deleage and Lorenzo Alfredo’s earnest bio-drama An L.A. Journey: The Story of Lorenzo Alfredo, about an orphan child’s journey, without papers, from Guatemala to L.A. Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Someday a play may come along to challenge the prevailing view that anyone who handles other people’s money for a living is a venal, soulless opportunist. John Bunzel’s “63 Trillion,in its world premiere guest-produced by New American Theatre at the Odyssey, is not that play. Read more…

 

Now running through June 7.

GUS’S FASHION & SHOES at Vs. Theatre Company

Photo by Azul DelGrasso

Photo by Azul DelGrasso

Steven Leigh Morris – LA Weekly

Ron Klier’s new play at Vs. Theatre Company, Gus’s Fashion & Shoes, is the second in a St. Louis–based trilogy about police/minority relations, Cops & Friends of Cops being the first in 2013. The third is yet to come. Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

The characters in Ron Klier’s new play “Gus’s Fashions & Shoes,” premiering at Vs. Theatre, are so colorful, argumentative and profane that they suggest the existence, and possibly the overuse, of some sort of David Mamet character generator app. Read more…

Pauline Adamek  – Stage Raw

Prior to the start of the show, the audience is blasted by gangster rap songs pumping through the speakers at an ear-splitting volume level — a fitting prelude to the edgy, darkly comedic drama that follows. Ron Klier’s Gus’s Fashions and Shoes is macho and talky, with all the action happening in the back room of a store and centering around five larger-than-life male characters. em>Read more…

Now running through May 30.

ENTROPY at Theatre of NOTE

Photo by Darrett Sanders

Photo by Darrett Sanders

Steven Leigh Morris – LA Weekly

Ground Control to Major Tom: David Bowie, Richard Nixon, the Cold War, the women’s liberation movement, early Steven Spielberg movies and a staff-impaired NASA space program from 1973 all combine into a Mel Brooks aesthetic in Bill Robens’ world-premiere farce Entropy, which just opened at Hollywood’s Theatre of NOTE. Read more…

Now running through May 30.