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LADCC Award Recipients

On March 16, 2015, the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle announced its winners and special awards for excellence in Los Angeles, Orange, and Ventura County theater in the year 2014. Announcements were made at a ceremony held at the Beyond the Stars Palace in Glendale, hosted by Dixie Longate (Dixie’s Tupperware Party) with musical direction by Corey B. Hirsch (LADCC award winner for A Man of No Importance in 2014).

 

Click here for complete list of nominees

 

The award recipients for the 2015 Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards were as follows:

 

Production

Firemen, The Echo Theater

Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

McCulloh Award for Revival (for plays written between 1920 and 1980)

A Delicate Balance, Odyssey Theatre Ensemble at Odyssey Theatre

 

Direction

Guillermo Cienfuegos, Henry V, Pacific Resident Theatre

Chris Fields, Firemen, The Echo Theater

Michael Michetti, Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Writing

Aaron Posner, Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

Marja-Lewis Ryan, One in the Chamber, 6140 Productions in association with Theatre Planners, Racquel Lehrman, Victoria Watson, Lynne Peck, Joe Cirincione, Ed Ryan and Robin Greenspun at The Lounge Theatre.

Tommy Smith, Firemen, The Echo Theater

Music Direction

David O, Floyd Collins, La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts

 

Choreography

Spencer Liff, Spring Awakening, Deaf West Theatre in association with The Forest of Arden, Cody Lassen, Jarrod Musano at Inner City Arts

 

Musical Score

Matt Almos, Brendan Milburn & Burglars of Hamm (original songs), The Behavior of Broadus, Sacred Fools Theater Company and Burglars of Hamm in association with Center Theatre Group at Sacred Fools Theater

Barry Manilow (music) and Bruce Sussman (lyrics), Harmony, Center Theatre Group and Alliance Theatre, Atlanta, GA, Ahmanson Theatre

 

Lead Performance

Ian Bamberg in Firemen, The Echo Theater

Patrick Stafford in Cock, Rogue Machine Theatre at Theatre/Theater

Heidi Sulzman in One in the Chamber, 6140 Productions in association with Theatre Planners, Racquel Lehrman, Victoria Watson, Lynne Peck, Joe Cirincione, Ed Ryan and Robin Greenspun at The Lounge Theatre

Cicely Tyson in The Trip to Bountiful, Center Theatre Group in association with ArtsEmerson at Ahmanson Theatre

Featured Performance

Rebecca Gray in Firemen, The Echo Theater

Tyler Pierce in Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

Joel Polis in My Name Is Asher Lev, The Fountain Theatre

 

Ensemble Performance

Cock, Rogue Machine Theatre at Theatre/Theater

Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Set Design

Jeff Cowie, The Trip to Bountiful, Center Theatre Group in association with ArtsEmerson at Ahmanson Theatre

 

Lighting Design

Jeremy Pivnick, Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Costume Design

Jenny Foldenauer, Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Sound Design

Doug Newell, Foxfinder, Furious Theatre Company in association with Artists Repertory Theatre of Portland, Oregon at Pasadena Playhouse Carrie Hamilton Theatre

 

Solo Performance

Annette Bening in Ruth Draper’s Monologues, Geffen Playhouse

Michael Urie in Buyer & Cellar, Center Theatre Group at Mark Taper Forum

 

CGI/Video

Jon Driscoll and Gemma Carrington, Noel Coward’s Brief Encounter, Kneehigh, Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts

 

Properties Design

John Burton, Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Special Effects

Tony Doublin and Gabe Bartalos, Taste, Sacred Fools Theater Company, The Schramm Group LLC and Red Hen Productions at Sacred Fools Theater

 

Illusions/Magic Design

Teller, Johnny Thompson, Thom Rubino and Christopher Rose, The Tempest, South Coast Repertory

 

Special Awards

The Ted Schmitt Award for the world premiere of an outstanding new play was presented to Sheila Callaghan for Everything You Touch. The award was accompanied by an offer to publish from Samuel French, Inc.

 

The Polly Warfield Award for an excellent season in a small to mid-size theater was presented to the Theatre @ Boston Court. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by the Nederlander Organization.

 

The Kinetic Lighting Award for outstanding achievement in theatrical design was presented to Cricket S. Myers. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by Kinetic Lighting, Inc.

 

The Margaret Harford Award for sustained excellence in theater was presented to Independent Shakespeare Company. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by an anonymous donor.

 

The Joel Hirschhorn Award for outstanding achievement in musical theatre was presented to 3D Theatricals. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by contributions from the theatrical community.

 

The Milton Katselas Award for career or special achievement in direction was presented to Robin Larsen. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by Beverly Hills Playhouse.

 

 

LADCC AWARDS CEREMONY 2015

BTS

This year’s LADCC AWARDS CEREMONY honoring the best of theater in Los Angeles in 2014 will be held on MARCH 16, 2015 at BEYOND THE STARS PALACE, 417 N. Brand Boulevard, Glendale, California 91203.  The event will begin at 6:30 pm and run to midnight.

PLEASE JOIN US.  Tickets are available at  brownpapertickets.com or at crixawards2015@gmail.com.

We hope to see you there.

A STATEMENT CONCERNING THE PROPOSED EQUITY CHANGES TO LOS ANGELES THEATER

The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle views the impending changes of policy concerning the small theaters of the greater Los Angeles area with alarm. We are concerned that the inevitable result of such changes will be a drastic reduction in the amount and quality of local theater. Indeed, we foresee what could be the virtual demise of Los Angeles as a leading incubator of plays and theater of innovation and diversity.

As critics, we are the front lines of the audience. Thus, we are keenly aware of the importance of small theaters and the actors who perform at them to the cultural ecosystem of Los Angeles as a major metropolitan center for the arts. Our institutional theaters and touring roadshows provide a valuable and popular service, but they alone do not and cannot provide the vast spectrum of forms of expression which a great city requires. Within that spectrum, live theater plays an essential role.

Under current proposals, nearly all of the winners of our Margaret Harford Award for sustained excellence over the past dozen years – our highest honor – would be threatened with closure or, at best, severely curtailed activities. A majority of the shows recognized in our annual nominations and awards would likely have never been produced. Worse, the future would promise a vastly constricted, less diverse, less venturesome, less exciting theater scene.

The cultural loss would be incalculable, affecting the hundreds of productions staged annually in Los Angeles. The economic loss of all the businesses interdependent on that production output is calculable, but even without the numbers being run, we believe the net impact on the city could be catastrophic. If not of the order of magnitude of the recent threatened port closure, it is analogous in import and effect.

The inner workings of an artists’ association, like the management of a corporation, are not the public’s business unless or until the impact of those actions has a material adverse effect on civic life, the general welfare, the region’s economic well-being, or a city’s core identity. At that point, an association’s practices become an appropriate matter for intense public concern. In the current situation, it is of critical importance that discussion and debate concerning these developments take place openly and extensively in the public sphere by all affected stakeholders. The goal is a healthier, more diverse society that provides greater opportunity for all, including the freedom of artists to develop their talents as they believe themselves to be best served.

The current situation is urgent and dire. When an historic piece of eminent architecture is destroyed, a natural resource despoiled, or a species goes extinct, the loss is irreplaceable. Once the infrastructure that undergirds the best of Los Angeles small theater is destroyed, it cannot, realistically, be resurrected. By the time the pain is finally felt and the general outcry heard, the possibility of effective action will have already been long foreclosed.

The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle urges all stakeholders in the cultural, civic and economic health of the region to involve themselves in learning about the issues and consequences of the proposals currently on the table. The Mayor, the City Council and the Board of Supervisors need to consider the economic ramifications. Foundations and opinion leaders must consider the changes’ potential impact on their missions. Major media must contribute to the disciplined and thoughtful public discourse, even as social media air opinions on all sides. All of these stakeholders have a role to play in a civic crisis, and make no mistake, a crisis is what we are facing. Moreover, it is a crisis whose quiet and parochial buildup has served to sidestep public attention and debate. Very soon, it may be too late.

CORKTOWN 57 at the Odyssey Theatre

pHOTO BY eD kRIEGER

Photo by Ed Krieger

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

Corktown 57 unfolds entirely in the Irish-quarter grocery-shop basement of Frank Keating (John Ruby), who’s having difficulties with his wife (Natalie Britton, in a nicely textured performance). Read more...

David C. Nichols – LA Times

Family dynamics and political ire mix it up in “Corktown ‘57” at the Odyssey Theatre. Playwright John Fazakerley’s account of a volatile clan in Philadelphia’s Irish quarter owes more than a little to Eugene O’Neill and Sean O’Casey, but it has plenty of emotional and ideological fodder of its own. Read more…

Now running through May 3.

THE GLASS MENAGERIE at the Renegade Theatre

Photo by Theodora Greece

Photo by Theodora Greece

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

The published text of Tennessee Williams’ play is rife with stage directions insisting that it’s not a realistic play, but its production history suggests that Williams didn’t trust his own creation. When it’s performed with honesty and simplicity, as it is here, debates about realism vs. memory seem merely academic. Read more…

Now running through May 17.

 

MR. WOLF at South Coast Repertory

Photo by Debora Robinson

Photo by Debora Robinson

Terry Morgan  -  Stage Raw

The things that are good about Rajiv Joseph’s new play Mr. Wolf outweigh the things that are misguided, enough that one hopes the author will use this world premiere to tighten the play’s focus and deepen its impact. The current production at South Coast Repertory benefits from an excellent cast and a veteran director in David Emmes, but other elements of the show, such as the set design, are somewhat lacking. Read more…

Now running through May 3.

NEVER GIVING UP

Photo by Maury Phillips / Getty Images for The Broad Stage

Photo by Maury Phillips / Getty Images for The Broad Stage

Jonas Schwartz -  Arts In LA

Anna Deavere Smith is an American treasure. She is a vivid storyteller who has mastered building monologues from interviews with those affected by her subject matter. She captures the cadence and moods of the real people she impersonates and finds the most penetrating details to flesh out. em>Read more…

Melinda Schupmann –  ShowMag

Anna Deveare Smith has an impressive resume. She is an artist-in-residence at the Center for American Progress, a professor in the Department of Performance Studies at the Tisch School of the Arts in New York, a lecturer at the NYU School of Law, and formerly taught at Stanford and Carnegie Mellon University. In addition, she is a talented actress performing in television, film, and theater. Read more…

Pauline Adamek  – Stage Raw

Since 1992, writer-performer Anna Deavere Smith has performed several one-person shows, employing her perfected documentary theater style. She describes her new show as a “rhetoric of hope.” Read more…

I AND YOU at the Fountain Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Pauline Adamek  – ArtsBeatLA

In Lauren Gunderson’s bittersweet drama, two high school students are thrown together to work on a school project about Walt Whitman’s poem Leaves of Grass. Gradually the pair forge an unusual friendship. Read more…

Now running through June 14.

Neil LaBute, on his play The Break of Noon

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Steven Leigh Morris – Stage Raw

The meister of messy and cruel romantic relationships, in works such as In the Company of Men, The Shape of Things, Fat Pig and Reasons to Be Pretty, playwright, screenwriter and film director Neil LaBute shines a spotlight on atrocious behavior.  Read more…

 

ZJU Theatre Group at ZJU Theatre Group

Photo by Roger K. Weiss

Photo by Roger K. Weiss

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

Witch balls played a part in people’s lives in 17th and 18th century Britain and America. Historically they were benevolent objects, placed in windows or on the mantle to ward off evil spirits. Read more…

Now running through May 9.

THE GREAT WAR at Redcat

Photo by Joost van den Broek

Photo by Joost van den Broek

Hoyt Hilsman  -  Huffington Post

Dutch performance group Hotel Modern, along with sound designer and composer Arthur Sauer, have created a fascinating, innovative and riveting miniature reenactment of World War I, using an imaginative mix of toy soldiers and tiny landscapes, along with a mélange of media and soundscape.Read more…

 

BANG BANG at Highways

Photo by Gina Long

Photo by Gina Long

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

In Michael Kearns’ Bang Bang, there’s a psycho-sexual serial killer named Dr. JackL and MisterHide&Seek (David Pevsner in a bravely unrepentant performance) whose fetish is to stand nude with his head masked in leather, to make Internet contact with his hitherto unknown male victims before meeting them (ostensibly for a romantic interlude) in their abodes, where they’ve been instructed to await him while lying naked on their stomachs with their buttocks raised. Read more…

Paul Birchall  – Stage Raw

Playwright Michael Kearns’ latest opus is like a dark funhouse ride, in which kaleidoscopic fragments of themes shift and coalesce into entirely different ideas from scene to scene.  It’s a drama that frustrates even as its emotions connect with ferocious power. Read more…

Now running through April 25.

THE DISCORD ALTAR at the Secret Rose Theatre

Photo by Amanda McRaven

Photo by Amanda McRaven

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

Improvisation in the theatre is hardly a new thing, and more and more it seems to become a useful part of the movie-making process. Improvised comedy has become downright ubiquitous, and was practiced with glorious expertise by Mike Nichols and Elaine May way back in the 1950s. But improvised opera? Read more…

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

Opera is a challenging art form — and opera improvised more challenging still.

In The Discord Altar, a musical ensemble rises to that challenge, creating harmonious on-the-spot vocals to accompany a set libretto by Meghan Brown and instrumental music (also improvised) by pianist Ann Baltz and percussionist Ray Salas.  Read more…

Now running through May 3.

 

THE POWER OF DUFF at the Geffen Playhouse

duff

Photo by Michael Lamont

Bob Verini -   Arts In LA

The inciting incident of The Power of Duff, Stephen Belber’s new play at the Geffen, occurs early. Local Rochester, N.Y. news anchor Charlie Duff (Josh Stamberg)—having lost his wife to divorce, his son to resentment, and now his long-estranged dad to death—closes a broadcast with a spontaneous, brief “rest-in-peace” prayer.Read more…

 Margaret Gray – LA Times

The inciting incident of The Power of Duff, Stephen Belber’s new play at the Geffen, occurs early. Local Rochester, N.Y. news anchor Charlie Duff (Josh Stamberg)—having lost his wife to divorce, his son to resentment, and now his long-estranged dad to death—closes a broadcast with a spontaneous, brief “rest-in-peace” prayer.Read more…

Dany Margolies – The Daily News

Charlie Duff is disconnected. Despite being an evening-news anchor on a non-network station in Rochester, N.Y., he exists in solitude and obliviousness. Read more…

Jonas Schwartz – TheaterMania

The Power of Duff commingles the dangerous elements of faith and mass media. The Geffen Playhouse is now presenting playwright Stephen Belber’s comedy, the first production since its 2013 premiere at Huntington Theatre Company in Boston. Read more…

Now running through May 17.

SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET at the El Portal

Sweeney 2

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

There’s such an assortment of riches in this stellar rendering of Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s operatic musical that I can only begin by commending director Kristin Towers-Rowles. She’s brought together a superb ensemble, equally impressive musically and in dramatic performance. It’s an accomplishment all the more notable for being produced in such a small venue. Read more…

Now running through May 10.