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LA CAGES AU FOLLES at East West Players

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

David C. Nichols – LA Times

The best of times are now at the David Henry Hwang Theatre, where East West Players concludes its 50th anniversary season with an idiosyncratically endearing revival of “La Cage aux Folles.” Read more…

Now running through June 26

I ONLY HAVE EYES FOR YOU at the Ricardo Montalban Theatre

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Margaret Gray – LA Times

Al Dubin wrote lyrics for enduring songs of the stage and screen, won an Academy Award in 1936 for “Lullaby of Broadway” and may be best known for his five-year partnership with Harry Warren at Warner Bros., which produced a string of hits — “42nd Street,” “We’re in the Money,” “I Only Have Eyes for You” and “The Boulevard of Broken Dreams,” among others. Read more…

Now running through June 12

THE HAIRY APE at the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble

Photo by Enci Box

Photo by Enci Box

Myron Meisel – Stage Raw

Class warfare has surged and ebbed in the U.S. public consciousness during harder or more prosperous times throughout the past century, but the distorted perversion that it is something waged by the poor upon privileged victims gets exposed as a disingenuous lie by Eugene O’Neill’s 1922 The Hairy Ape – an anguished cry on behalf the exploited and dismissed. Read more…

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

Throughout his long and productive career, playwright Eugene O’Neill pursued a course of experimentation, producing works both in a realistic style and in an expressionist mode that attempted to go beyond the limits of conventional theatre. The Hairy Ape in 1922 was the second of his attempts to transcend realism, following The Emperor Jones the previous year. Read more…

Now running through July 17

BILL AND DR. BOB at the Noho Arts Center

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Photo by Isabel Wagner

Lovell Estell III – Stage Raw

Ask anyone whether they’ve heard of Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) and you’ll probably get a quick “yes,” along with an annoyed “what a stupid question” stare.  But it’s a safe bet that the names Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith wouldn’t be recognized. They were the men who started the organization in the unenlightened 1930’s, Read more…

Now running through June 5

 

THE CITY OF CONVERSATION at the Bram Goldsmith Theatre at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts

Photo by Kevin Parry forThe Wallis

Photo by Kevin Parry forThe Wallis

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

In one way, The City of Conversation can be seen as playwright’s paean to the bygone politics of 20th century America —in retrospect a fairer and far less brutal game than the one played today. Read more…

Now running through June 4

JOHN IS A FATHER at the Road on Lankershim

Photo by Dan Bonnell

Photo by Dan Bonnell

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

John (Sam Anderson), the title character in Julie Marie Myatt’s long one-act, is a bitter and guilt-ridden man. A hard-drinking womanizer and jail-bird, he became a father, but a very reluctant one.
Read more…

Now running through July 3

HONKY at Rogue Machine at the MET Theatre

Photo by John Perrin Flynn

Photo by John Perrin Flynn

Myron Meisel – Stage Raw

For a considerable time now, it has become exceptionally difficult to shock an audience, a gambit that used to be an important arrow in the artist’s quiver. Nevertheless, in a society where in recent years the most dreaded circumstance has become to feel in any colorable way “awkward”, discomfiting the viewer may now be the next best thing.    Read more…

Now running through June 12

FORECLOSURE OR YELLING AT WOMEN WALKING THEIR DOGS at Greenway Court Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

What happens to a working-class alpha male when he loses his work? The consequences of such are on brilliant display in playwright/performer Raymond J. Barry’s Foreclosure or Yelling at Women Walking Their Dogs, a taut penetrating one-act that rivets around a fractured American family and the never-ending battle between philistinism and art. Read more…

Now running through May 28

IN & OF ITSELF at the Geffen Playhouse

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Photo by Jeff Lorch

Margaret Gray – LA Times

The first time Derek DelGaudio performed at the Geffen Playhouse — in the 2012 show “Nothing to Hide,” which he created with co-star Helder Guimarães and director Neil Patrick Harris — DelGaudio ended up staying longer than expected: The magic act, originally slotted for a one-month run, packed the house for 18 weeks. Read more…

Dany Margolies – Arts in LA

Derek DelGaudio’s world premiere In & of Itself proves him to be a captivating performer and a mesmerizing illusionist. He is not quite yet the philosopher he purports to be, but kernels of interesting ideas weave through the piece—such as making personal pain disappear like a house of cards. Read more…

Jenny Lower – LA Weekly

Derek DelGaudio’s new solo show at the Geffen Playhouse’s black-box theater is a lot different from other one-man ventures. For one thing, there’s magic. And unlike the impulse to overshare that weighs down so many other autobiographical efforts, DelGaudio cloaks his personal storytelling in mythological allusions….. Read more…

Pauline Adamek  – ArtsBeatLA

The illusion and prestidigitation show, In & Of Itself, presently playing at the Geffen Playhouse, feels somewhat underwhelming. Ostensibly a very short evening with a solo performer (one hour and five minutes) the show unfolds at a languid pace. Read more…

Now running through June 26

THE BIG MEAL at Chance Theatre

Photo courtesy of Chance Theatre

Photo courtesy of Chance Theatre

Melinda Schupmann – Arts In LA

Love, marriage, birth, and death are fodder for Dan LeFranc’s fast-paced narrative spotlighting a couple who meet, marry, and produce several generations in the space of 90 minutes.Read more…

Now running through May 22

 

 

 

THE PAVILION at the Malibu Playhouse

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Margaret Gray – LA Times

Craig Wright’s often-produced play “The Pavilion,” now in a lovely revival at Malibu Playhouse, takes place in the early 2000s, in the fictional town of Pine City, Minn. (That’s where Wright, who also has a long list of TV writing credits including “Six Feet Under,” “Lost” and “Dirty Sexy Money,” has set a number of plays.)   Read more…

Now running through May 22

GOOD PEOPLE at the Hudson Theatre Guild

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Liz Kravetz Photography

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

The American Dream is an unforgiving myth. Birthed in rural America in the early 19th century, it galloped to prominence in the Gilded Age, championed by Horatio Alger’s novels and the ever more ubiquitous notion that wealth and opportunity are equally available to everyone and that any deserving individual who works hard can achieve success. Read more…

Now running through June 5