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LADCC Award Recipients

On March 16, 2015, the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle announced its winners and special awards for excellence in Los Angeles, Orange, and Ventura County theater in the year 2014. Announcements were made at a ceremony held at the Beyond the Stars Palace in Glendale, hosted by Dixie Longate (Dixie’s Tupperware Party) with musical direction by Corey B. Hirsch (LADCC award winner for A Man of No Importance in 2014).

 

Click here for complete list of nominees

 

The award recipients for the 2015 Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards were as follows:

 

Production

Firemen, The Echo Theater

Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

McCulloh Award for Revival (for plays written between 1920 and 1980)

A Delicate Balance, Odyssey Theatre Ensemble at Odyssey Theatre

 

Direction

Guillermo Cienfuegos, Henry V, Pacific Resident Theatre

Chris Fields, Firemen, The Echo Theater

Michael Michetti, Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Writing

Aaron Posner, Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

Marja-Lewis Ryan, One in the Chamber, 6140 Productions in association with Theatre Planners, Racquel Lehrman, Victoria Watson, Lynne Peck, Joe Cirincione, Ed Ryan and Robin Greenspun at The Lounge Theatre.

Tommy Smith, Firemen, The Echo Theater

Music Direction

David O, Floyd Collins, La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts

 

Choreography

Spencer Liff, Spring Awakening, Deaf West Theatre in association with The Forest of Arden, Cody Lassen, Jarrod Musano at Inner City Arts

 

Musical Score

Matt Almos, Brendan Milburn & Burglars of Hamm (original songs), The Behavior of Broadus, Sacred Fools Theater Company and Burglars of Hamm in association with Center Theatre Group at Sacred Fools Theater

Barry Manilow (music) and Bruce Sussman (lyrics), Harmony, Center Theatre Group and Alliance Theatre, Atlanta, GA, Ahmanson Theatre

 

Lead Performance

Ian Bamberg in Firemen, The Echo Theater

Patrick Stafford in Cock, Rogue Machine Theatre at Theatre/Theater

Heidi Sulzman in One in the Chamber, 6140 Productions in association with Theatre Planners, Racquel Lehrman, Victoria Watson, Lynne Peck, Joe Cirincione, Ed Ryan and Robin Greenspun at The Lounge Theatre

Cicely Tyson in The Trip to Bountiful, Center Theatre Group in association with ArtsEmerson at Ahmanson Theatre

Featured Performance

Rebecca Gray in Firemen, The Echo Theater

Tyler Pierce in Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

Joel Polis in My Name Is Asher Lev, The Fountain Theatre

 

Ensemble Performance

Cock, Rogue Machine Theatre at Theatre/Theater

Stupid Fucking Bird, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Circle X Theatre Company at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Set Design

Jeff Cowie, The Trip to Bountiful, Center Theatre Group in association with ArtsEmerson at Ahmanson Theatre

 

Lighting Design

Jeremy Pivnick, Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Costume Design

Jenny Foldenauer, Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Sound Design

Doug Newell, Foxfinder, Furious Theatre Company in association with Artists Repertory Theatre of Portland, Oregon at Pasadena Playhouse Carrie Hamilton Theatre

 

Solo Performance

Annette Bening in Ruth Draper’s Monologues, Geffen Playhouse

Michael Urie in Buyer & Cellar, Center Theatre Group at Mark Taper Forum

 

CGI/Video

Jon Driscoll and Gemma Carrington, Noel Coward’s Brief Encounter, Kneehigh, Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts

 

Properties Design

John Burton, Everything You Touch, The Theatre @ Boston Court and Rattlestick Playwrights Theater at The Theatre @ Boston Court

 

Special Effects

Tony Doublin and Gabe Bartalos, Taste, Sacred Fools Theater Company, The Schramm Group LLC and Red Hen Productions at Sacred Fools Theater

 

Illusions/Magic Design

Teller, Johnny Thompson, Thom Rubino and Christopher Rose, The Tempest, South Coast Repertory

 

Special Awards

The Ted Schmitt Award for the world premiere of an outstanding new play was presented to Sheila Callaghan for Everything You Touch. The award was accompanied by an offer to publish from Samuel French, Inc.

 

The Polly Warfield Award for an excellent season in a small to mid-size theater was presented to the Theatre @ Boston Court. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by the Nederlander Organization.

 

The Kinetic Lighting Award for outstanding achievement in theatrical design was presented to Cricket S. Myers. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by Kinetic Lighting, Inc.

 

The Margaret Harford Award for sustained excellence in theater was presented to Independent Shakespeare Company. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by an anonymous donor.

 

The Joel Hirschhorn Award for outstanding achievement in musical theatre was presented to 3D Theatricals. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by contributions from the theatrical community.

 

The Milton Katselas Award for career or special achievement in direction was presented to Robin Larsen. The award was accompanied by an honorarium funded by Beverly Hills Playhouse.

 

 

LADCC AWARDS CEREMONY 2015

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This year’s LADCC AWARDS CEREMONY honoring the best of theater in Los Angeles in 2014 will be held on MARCH 16, 2015 at BEYOND THE STARS PALACE, 417 N. Brand Boulevard, Glendale, California 91203.  The event will begin at 6:30 pm and run to midnight.

PLEASE JOIN US.  Tickets are available at  brownpapertickets.com or at crixawards2015@gmail.com.

We hope to see you there.

A STATEMENT CONCERNING THE PROPOSED EQUITY CHANGES TO LOS ANGELES THEATER

The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle views the impending changes of policy concerning the small theaters of the greater Los Angeles area with alarm. We are concerned that the inevitable result of such changes will be a drastic reduction in the amount and quality of local theater. Indeed, we foresee what could be the virtual demise of Los Angeles as a leading incubator of plays and theater of innovation and diversity.

As critics, we are the front lines of the audience. Thus, we are keenly aware of the importance of small theaters and the actors who perform at them to the cultural ecosystem of Los Angeles as a major metropolitan center for the arts. Our institutional theaters and touring roadshows provide a valuable and popular service, but they alone do not and cannot provide the vast spectrum of forms of expression which a great city requires. Within that spectrum, live theater plays an essential role.

Under current proposals, nearly all of the winners of our Margaret Harford Award for sustained excellence over the past dozen years – our highest honor – would be threatened with closure or, at best, severely curtailed activities. A majority of the shows recognized in our annual nominations and awards would likely have never been produced. Worse, the future would promise a vastly constricted, less diverse, less venturesome, less exciting theater scene.

The cultural loss would be incalculable, affecting the hundreds of productions staged annually in Los Angeles. The economic loss of all the businesses interdependent on that production output is calculable, but even without the numbers being run, we believe the net impact on the city could be catastrophic. If not of the order of magnitude of the recent threatened port closure, it is analogous in import and effect.

The inner workings of an artists’ association, like the management of a corporation, are not the public’s business unless or until the impact of those actions has a material adverse effect on civic life, the general welfare, the region’s economic well-being, or a city’s core identity. At that point, an association’s practices become an appropriate matter for intense public concern. In the current situation, it is of critical importance that discussion and debate concerning these developments take place openly and extensively in the public sphere by all affected stakeholders. The goal is a healthier, more diverse society that provides greater opportunity for all, including the freedom of artists to develop their talents as they believe themselves to be best served.

The current situation is urgent and dire. When an historic piece of eminent architecture is destroyed, a natural resource despoiled, or a species goes extinct, the loss is irreplaceable. Once the infrastructure that undergirds the best of Los Angeles small theater is destroyed, it cannot, realistically, be resurrected. By the time the pain is finally felt and the general outcry heard, the possibility of effective action will have already been long foreclosed.

The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle urges all stakeholders in the cultural, civic and economic health of the region to involve themselves in learning about the issues and consequences of the proposals currently on the table. The Mayor, the City Council and the Board of Supervisors need to consider the economic ramifications. Foundations and opinion leaders must consider the changes’ potential impact on their missions. Major media must contribute to the disciplined and thoughtful public discourse, even as social media air opinions on all sides. All of these stakeholders have a role to play in a civic crisis, and make no mistake, a crisis is what we are facing. Moreover, it is a crisis whose quiet and parochial buildup has served to sidestep public attention and debate. Very soon, it may be too late.

THE CURIOUS SAVAGE at the Torrance Theatre Company

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Photo by Alex Madrid

Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

Being told “I love you” is nice. But there are more effective ways of expressing love. The characters at the heart of “The Curious Savage” — at Torrance Theatre Co. through April 19 — clearly know this. They, however, are locked up in a sanitarium. Read more…

Now running through April 19.

MAME at the Westchester Playhouse

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Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

The rarely revived “Mame” is running at Kentwood Players’ Westchester Playhouse through April 18, and that alone should evoke gratitude. But only the memorably joyous melodies of Jerry Herman’s score, the set, and very few competent performances keep this production from verging on the disastrous. Read more…

Now running through April 18.

CARRIE THE MUSICAL at the La Mirada Theatre for the Peforming Arts

Photo by Jason Niedle

Photo by Jason Niedle

David C. Nichols – LA Times

Never underestimate the power of stagecraft. Case in point: ”Carrie: The Musical,” now receiving a mind-blowing immersive production at La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts. Read more…

Jonas Schwartz -  TheaterMania

Few musicals are as infamous as the 1988 Broadway bomb Carrie. That notoriety was enhanced by the bootlegged CDs and videotapes of the original cast that made the rounds for years in the days before YouTube. Utilizing the major rewrite for the 2012 off-Broadway production, La Mirada Theatre performs the show for its intimate “On Stage” series where audiences sit on the stage in bleachers, making them practically players in the proceedings. Read more…

Now running through April 5.

 

TREVOR at the Atwater Village Theatre

Ryan Miller / Capture Imaging

Ryan Miller / Capture Imaging

David C. Nichols – LA Times

“Sandra, I’m home. No go on the Dunkin’ Donuts job.” Thus the title character of “Trevor,” presented by Circle X Theatre Co., grabs our attention in a 200-pound death grip. Read more…

Now running through April 19.

VERDIGRIS at Theatre West

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Photo by Charlie Mount

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Theatre West has revived Jim Beaver’s play “Verdigris,” a hit for the company 30 years ago, about a young man’s absorption into an offbeat Oklahoma family in the summer of 1972. Read more…

Now running through April 19.

 

SIGHT UNSEEN at the Lounge Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

The most interesting scene in this production of Donald Margulies’s 1992 play involves an encounter between Jonathan (Jason Weiss), a successful Jewish-American painter having a much-touted exhibition in London, and Grete (Casey McKinnon), an art journalist of German extraction who is interviewing him. Read more…

Now running through April 26.

TOKYO FISH STORY at South Coast Repertory

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Photo by Ben Horak

Margaret Gray – LA Times

There are plenty of fish in the sea, we console ourselves when loved ones escape our nets. But in Kimber Lee’s new play, “tokyo fish story,” having its world premiere at South Coast Repertory, the truth of this old proverb is in doubt. Read more…

Bob Verini  -   Stage Raw

Admirers of the 2011 documentary “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” should settle in comfortably for Kimber Lee’s tokyo fish story. Read more…

Now running through March 29.

FIGARO at A Noise Within

Photo by Craig Schwartz

Photo by Craig Schwartz

David C. Nichols – LA Times

Eighteenth century subversion meets Larry David lunacy in “Figaro” at A Noise Within. Ingenuity permeates this buoyant adaptation of Beaumarchais’ classic account of one crazy day at the Almavivas’, circa 1784 or 2015, take your pick. Read more…

Now running through May 10.

 

THE GAME AGAINST BOBBY FISCHER at the Secret Rose Theatre

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 Jenny Lower – LA Weekly

The Game Against Bobby Fischer, a new play written by Dennis Richard and directed by Gregory Fuller at the Secret Rose Theatre, purports to enter the troubled mind of renowned American World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer (Robert Weiner) as he approaches his final days in his adopted home of Reykjavik, Iceland. Read more…

Now running through March 29.

SWITZERLAND at the Geffen Playhouse

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Photo by Michael Lamont

Bob Verini – Variety

Writers of crime fiction are rarely as brutal or twisted as the characters they create. But meet Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995), by general agreement a foul-mouthed misanthrope who spent decades detailing the psychotic narcissism lurking in humanity’s dark heart. Read more…

Hoyt Hilsman  -  Huffington Post

Crime novelist Patricia Highsmith was renowned for her intense psychological thrillers, particularly her series featuring the murderer Tom Ripley, but she was also known for her reclusive, abrasive and even hateful personality. Read more…

Myron Meisel – Stage Raw

If the unexamined life is not worth living, then for novelist Patricia Highsmith (Laura Linney, making her Los Angeles stage debut), detached dissector of amoral murder, the unimagined death may not be worth dying. This is suggested by Australian Joanna Murray-Smith’s new play Switzerland, an original commission by The Geffen Playhouse presented as a co-premiere with The Sydney Theatre Company. Read more…

Sharon Perlmutter  -  Talkin’ Broadway

There are some plays, like Small Engine Repair, in which the entertainment comes from truly not knowing what’s going to happen. If the plot is spoiled, the journey is much less fun. This causes something of a problem in telling you enough about the play for you to make an informed decision on whether you’ll enjoy it, while not telling you too much. Read more…

Now running through April 19.

SPOON RIVER: THE CEMETERY ON THE HILL at the Eclectic Company Theatre

Photo by David Nott

Photo by David Nott

Edgar Lee Masters’  Spoon River Anthology was first published in 1915, and is probably referenced in just about every grade or middle-school American literature text ever adopted. Read more…

Now running through March 22.