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Archive for East West Players

NEXT TO NORMAL at East West Players

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

Margaret Gray – LA Times

East West Players wraps up its 51st season, dedicated to “the female perspective,” with a revival of “Next to Normal,” the Tony- and Pulitzer-winning musical about a suburban housewife’s struggle with mental illness and its effect on her family, played here by an Asian American cast. Read more…

Now running through June 11

LA CAGES AU FOLLES at East West Players

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

David C. Nichols – LA Times

The best of times are now at the David Henry Hwang Theatre, where East West Players concludes its 50th anniversary season with an idiosyncratically endearing revival of “La Cage aux Folles.” Read more…

Now running through June 26

CRIERS FOR HIRE at East West Players

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Culture shock, like grief, progresses through distinct stages: There’s the honeymoon period, when an expatriate is enchanted by a new country. Bliss gives way to withdrawal and hostility, the adjustment and, ultimately, acceptance. This journey happens to have a pleasing narrative structure that works well onstage. Read more…

Now running through March 13.

 

WASHER/DRYER at East West Players

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

David C. Nichols – LA Times

The fluff and fold of old-school boulevard comedy typifies “Washer/Dryer” at East West Players. Indeed, playwright Nandita Shenoy’s study of intercultural newlyweds attempting to co-habit in a New York City co-op is an amiable throwback to the days when “Barefoot in the Park” played the Great White Way. Read more…

Dany Margolies  -  Arts In LA

At its essence, Washer/Dryer is about a newlywed couple who need to clean up their lives. Playwright Nandita Shenoy gives us Sonya, of Indian extraction, and Michael, of Chinese. They apparently didn’t talk over their needs and goals thoroughly before marrying. Read more…

TAKARAZUKA!!! at East West Players

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

David C. Nichols – LA Times

A high degree of skill and individuality accompanies “Takarazuka!!!” at East West Players. In its elegant West Coast premiere, Susan Soon He Stanton’s very promising albeit still-forming play with music uses the famed all-female troupe in the titular Japanese city as a backdrop to an intriguing study of gender roles, intergenerational schisms and the cost of success. Read more…

Now running through Dec. 7.

A NICE INDIAN BOY at East West Players

Photo by Michael Lamont

Photo by Michael Lamont

 David C. Nichols – LA Times

“Modern Family” goes Bollywood in “A Nice Indian Boy,” now receiving a stalwart premiere at East West Players. Although Madhuri Shekar’s same-sex variant on the time-honored culture-clash comedy has its unfinished aspects, it’s pleasantly funny entertainment. Read more…

Now running through March 23.

THE NISEI WIDOWS CLUB at East West Players

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

Writer Betty Tokudani’s cliché-ridden comedy centers on four elderly women whose curmudgeonly cluelessness we are supposed to find endearing. Vain, stylish Tomi (Jeanne Sakata) is mourning her middle-aged son, a mama’s boy who for years gobbled her high-cholesterol food, then died young of a heart attack. Her friends strive to be sympathetic but struggle to handle Tomi’s drama-queen antics.
Read more…

Nisei

Now running through December 8.

Encounter, East West Players in association with Navarasa Dance Theatre, David Henry Hwang Theater

Photo by Don Perrault_LR

 

Encounter,

by Aparna Sindhoor, Anil Natyaveda, and S M Raju.

 

Dany Margolies, ArtsInLA

The wisdom of the adage “Show, don’t tell” quickly becomes apparent in this dance-theater piece. And symbolic “showing” can be even more evocative than realism, which may explain why the storytelling here leaves the viewer shattered. In a universal tale about shortsighted despotism and evilly wielded power, only the production’s beautiful theatricality comes out the winner.  Read more…

 

Mayank Keshaviah – LA Weekly

Often the more specific something is, the more universal it feels. As such, this dance drama by Navarasa Dance Theatre, about Indian farmworker-turned-freedom fighter Dopdi Mejhen (Aparna Sindhoor), could just as easily have taken place in Rwanda, El Salvador or China. Mejhen, husband Dulna Majhi (Anil Natyaveda) and their fellow adivasis (indigenous tribals) are victims of the Indian military, who orchestrate “encounters” to kill or torture so-called enemies of the state. Interestingly, both groups are played by the same actors/dancers.  Read more…