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Archive for International City Theatre

THE LEGEND OF GEORGIA MCBRIDE at International City Theatre

Photo by Kayte Deioma

Photo by Kayte Deioma

Rob Stevens – Haines His Way

Can an Elvis Impersonator reinvent himself as a drag queen? More to the point–can an impoverished married straight man with a child on the way become a successful star drag act? This is the thin premise that playwright Matthew Lopez has used to create his hilariously outrageous ode to the art of drag The Legend of Georgia McBride at International City Theatre in Long Beach. Women grab your best gay friend; men clutch your pearls and enjoy the rip-roaring good time that director Jamie Torcellini has staged. Read more…

Now through June 26

To hell (and back?) in TOOTSIE and HADESTOWN: Plus, A Heated Discussion, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, A Doll’s House Part 2, Masao and the Bronze Nightingale, Jane Austen Unscripted

Photo by Evan Zimmerman for MurphyMade

Photo by Evan Zimmerman for MurphyMade

Don Shirley – Angeles Stage

Just over a month ago, millions of us witnessed a dramatic descent into chaos onstage at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. At the Oscar ceremony, the usual back-patting was upstaged by the unscripted cheek-slapping of Chris Rock by Will Smith.

Now fresh drama has returned to the Dolby. Last Tuesday, the stage musical adaptation of “Tootsie” made its first LA appearance there, under the auspices of Broadway in Hollywood, depicting a very different fall from grace. It’s a contemporary take on the beloved 1982 film comedy about a man who enjoys steady employment — and even fame — while posing as a woman, before his ruse is exposed. Read more…

 

A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2 at International City Theatre

Photo by Kayte Deioma

Photo by Kayte Deioma

Rob Stevens – Haines His Way

In 1879, Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen shook up the theatrical world with his “feminist” play A Doll’s House. In 2017, up and coming young American playwright Lucas Hnath wrote a sequel, A Doll’s House, Part 2, that picked up the action 15 years later. Read more...

Steven Leigh Morris – Stage Raw

What is the point of writing and staging a sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s 1894 world classic A Doll’s House – perhaps the earliest call to feminism in modern stage literature? Read more…

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THE 39 STEPS at International City Theatre

Tracey Roman

Tracey Roman

Melinda Schupmann – Arts In LA

When it comes to suspense, Alfred Hitchcock is the acknowledged master. In 1935 he directed The 39 Steps, an adaptation of John Buchan’s popular British spy novel. The hero of the book is Richard Hannay, an ordinary man on the run from the authorities because he is a suspect in a murder.
Read more…

Now running through July 8

DADDY LONG LEGS at International City Theatre

 

Tracey Roman

Tracey Roman

Ellen Dostal – Broadway World

It can be a wonderful adventure to watch two people falling in love, particularly when they themselves don’t realize it’s happening. When the adventure takes place on stage – as in John Caird and Paul Gordon’s musical two-hander DADDY LONG LEGS – the audience has an advantage because they get to see the relationship develop from both points of view.
Read more…

Now running through March 11

UNCANNY VALLEY at International City Theatre

Photo by Steven Georges

Photo by Steven Georges

Melinda Schupmann – Arts In LA

Playwright Thomas Gibbons says the title of this play refers to the feeling that people have when they’re confronted with a very realistic robot: a feeling of fascination. He adds, “But the more realistic the robot becomes, at some point that fascination turns to a kind of revulsion. They’re creeped out, and that effect is called the ‘uncanny valley.’” Read more…

Now running through May 7

VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE at International City Theatre.

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Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

Three great characters of classic dramatic literature don’t exactly appear in Christopher Durang’s tender comedy “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike.” But they inspire the personalities and circumstances of the play, and show us what’s in a name, in this production from Long Beach’s International City Theatre. Read more…

Shirle Gottlieb – Stage Happenings

Any theater aficionado can tell you that Anton Chekhov was one of the world’s leading playwrights. Born in Russia in the last half of the 19th-Century, he lived in poverty with an abusive father–in a, controlling country with a rigid class structure–until he put himself though medical school and became a doctor. With a  humanitarian outlook on life, Chekhov helped those in need during the day; and wrote his impressions of life as he knew it at night. Read more…

Now running through July 3

CLOSER THAN EVER at International City Theatre

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Dany Margolies – The Daily Breeze

The musical revue “Closer Than Ever” makes a lovely evening for folks who don’t want to be asked to dig into the meaning of songs, who prefer messages told simply. The music, too, though it has more than a few tinges of dissonance, doesn’t tax the listener.

Read more…

Now running through March 6

FENCES at International City Theatre

Photo by Suzanne Mapes

Photo by Suzanne Mapes

Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

August Wilson’s plays are as much about the historical experience of African-Americans as they are about any one of his characters. This is certainly true of Fences, which begins in 1957, a year marked by federal troops on the ground in Arkansas and the forced desegregation of Little Rock Central High School. Read more…

David C. Nichols – LA Times

You’ve got to take the crookeds with the straights,” says the disillusioned protagonist of “Fences” at International City Theatre. That observation indicates the multiple conflicts running through the late, great August Wilson’s 1987 study of a former Negro League player turned garbage collector battling prejudice, regrets and mortality. Read more…

Dany Margolies – Press-Telegram

Fences can keep people out and fences can keep people in. Fences separate races and generations. But for Troy Maxson, they also represent goals not reached and, for as long as he can manage, a barrier to death. Read more…

Shirle Gottlieb – Gazette Newspapers

If you’re a theater fan, you undoubtedly know that August Wilson, set out to write a 10-cycle play about the African-American experience — with one for each decade of the 20th Century.`Read more…

Now running through September 13.

 

THE HEIR APPARENT at International City Theatre, Long Beach Performing Arts Center

Photo by Susan Mapes

Photo by Susan Mapes

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Struggles over inheritance are always painful — unless, of course, they take place in a French farce, in which case they are endlessly prankish and ribald. Read more…

Myron Meisel – Stage Raw

David Ives’s“translaptation” of Jean-Francois Regnard’s 1708 farce The Heir Apparent (Le Legataire Universel), at International City Theatre, also involves a gathering to squabble over inheritance, only this time the corpse-to-be remains very much alive….Read more…

Shirle Gottlieb – Gazette Newspapers

Most people have never heard of French playwright Jean-Francois Regnard. Yet in his day, his work was compared to (and as popular as) the legendary comedies of Moliere — whose name is synonymous with the genre. Read more…

Now running through July 12.

END OF THE RAINBOW at International City Theatre

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Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

Some years before Judy Garland’s death, she appeared at a star-studded benefit for the Actors Studio in New York, alongside Carole Channing, Ava Gardner, Shelley Winters and Josephine Premice — and Judy’s children, including Liza Minelli. Judy wore a black satin evening suit, which emphasized her matchstick legs, the result of years of abuse of drugs and alcohol. Read more…

Melinda Schupmann – Arts In LA

Great talent is often accompanied by great torment. Judy Garland’s life was filled with frequent affairs, failed marriages, suicide attempts, and professional struggles even as she was declared by many to be the world’s greatest entertainer. Read more…

Now playing through March 15.

TRYING at International City Theatre

TRY

Photo by Suzanne Mapes

Melinda Schupmann – Arts In LA

A theatrical reminiscence by Joanna McClelland Glass about a time when she served as secretary to Judge Francis Biddle gets a standout production at International City Theatre. Its casting choices—Tony Abatemarco playing Biddle, Paige Lindsey White as his assistant Sarah “with an h”—make the very literate and demanding script a thoughtful and intimate view of two people whose lives are changing. Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

In “Trying,” now in a beautifully acted revival at Long Beach’s International City Theatre, the playwright Joanna McClelland Glass dramatizes the year she spent as secretary to Judge Francis Biddle in 1967-68. Read more…

Neal Weaver  – Stage Raw

In 1967, when she was just 24 years old, playwright Joanna McClelland Glass took a job as secretary to Judge Francis Biddle, who was nearing the end of a long and illustrious career. He was one of “the Philadelphia Biddles,” whose ancestors arrived in America in 1681. Read more…

Now running through Sept 14.