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Archive for Odyssey Theatre – Page 2

MY SISTER at the Odyssey Theatre

Photo by Enci Box

Photo by Enci Box

 Paul Birchall  – Stage Raw

Sometimes all a play really needs is two characters and some genuine emotion. Set in 1930s Berlin, playwright Janet Schlapkohl’s evocative two-hander tells of a pair of identical twin sisters (played by bona fide identical twins Elizabeth Hinkler and Emily Hinkler) beset by troubles as the Nazis rise in power all around them. Read more…

Pauline Adamek – ArtsBeatLA

Two sisters — identical twins — eke out an existence, sharing a single room in Berlin during the mid 30s. Magda (played by Emily Hinkler) is a lowly orderly at a hospital by day, though her dream career as singer and comedienne at a nightclub is starting to take off. Matilda (played by Elizabeth Hinkler) is afflicted with cerebral palsy, which greatly impairs her movements but not her mental faculties. She stays at home writing poetry as well as sketches and comedy routines for her sister to perform.  Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Horror doesn’t always announce its arrival; it can overtake us gradually. Few occupants of Germany in the years after World War I, for example, could have predicted the Holocaust, although in retrospect the signs look so clear.

Read more…

Now running through March 6

AWAKE AND SING at the Odyssey Theatre

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Photo by Ron Sossi

Melinda Schupmann – Arts In LA

When Awake and Sing! was produced in 1935, it was a transformative experience for theatergoers. Playwright Clifford Odets was an early member of the Group Theatre in New York, a lab for Stanislavski’s system of acting with a shared commitment among the collective for social change through theater. Read more…

Now running through November 29.

 

WHEN STARS ALIGN at the Odyssey Theatre

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Les Spindle –  Frontiers L.A.

There’s a hint of Gone With the Wind and a touch of vintage nighttime soap opera, merged with appealing musical interludes, in this ambitious stage adaptation of Carole Eglash-Kosoff‘s sprawling historical novel.

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Now running through Oct. 4.

WHEN STARS ALIGN at the Odyssey Theatre

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Photo by Ed Krieger

Melinda Schupmann – Arts In LA

When Stars Align is a novel by Carole Eglash-Kosoff, chronicling conflicts between advantaged whites and black slaves in the Civil War–era South. Now adapted into a play (by the author, with co-writer and director John Henry Davis) spanning many years, it blends history with the story of young black Thaddeus (Jason Woods) and the daughter of a plantation owner, Amy (Haley McHugh), who form a friendship in a time when to do so would be death to Thaddeus.

Read more…

Now running through Oct. 4.

CAFE SOCIETY at the Odyssey Theatre

Photo by Ed K

Photo by Ed Krieger

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

There are several hearty laughs to be had as the credits roll on Peter Lefcourt’s clichéd comedy, which is set in a West L.A. Starbucks where a homegrown terrorist is holding people hostage. Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

One unintended consequence of the communications age is the increased difficulty of putting together a believable plot.

Smartphones have essentially obviated the situations that promote dramatic conflict — getting trapped or stranded with other people, say — and the omnipresence of Wi-Fi makes it impossible to preserve a mystery. Read more…

Now running through Oct. 11.

THE FALSE SERVANT at the Odyssey Theatre

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Photo by Diego Baraj

Terry Morgan  -  Stage Raw

Every theater company has its ups and downs. It’s the nature of artistic endeavor. Evidence Room, celebrating its 20th anniversary as a company, has an admirable history of successful and award-winning plays, most recently with its producing partner, the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble. Unfortunately, their new show, Martin Crimp’s adaptation of Pierre Marivaux’s play The False Servant, is a misfire.  Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

We tend to think of ourselves as the most jaded social observers in history, so it’s always jarring to discover a nearly 300-year-old work of art with a more cynical outlook than our own.Read more…

Dany Margolies  -  Arts In LA

A theatrical nickel says Marivaux has never been performed this subtly. The 18th-century playwright’s work is normally expected to be performed with fluttering fans and rolling eyes. Not here, under the direction of Bart DeLorenzo. Read more…

Now running through September 6.

OFF THE KING’S ROAD at the Odyssey Theatre

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Photo by Ed Krieger

Dany Margolies  -  Arts In LA

An inspired supporting cast and a superb set salvage the heavily flawed script here. Neil Koenigsberg’s play is nobly modeled on the Bergman film Wild Strawberries, centering on an older man trying to come to grips with his regrets. But the writing is repetitious, it is on-the-nose, and it is predictable in a not-enjoyable way.

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

Sometimes a bad play can be redeemed with smart direction, or with charismatic performers who breathe life into an otherwise hackneyed script. And sometimes, as in Off the King’s Road, Neil Koenigsberg’s comedy directed by Amy Madigan at the Odyssey Theatre, the execution makes things worse.

Now running through August 2.

OEDIPUS MACHINA at the Odyssey Theatre

Photo by Enci Box

Photo by Enci Box

Jenny Lower – LA Weekly

Oedipus Rex may be one of the best known plays of the western canon, but it gets an alien staging, quite literally, in Ron Sossi’s inventive though uneven production at the Odyssey Theatre. Based on Ellen McLaughlin’s modernist, poetic adaptation of the text, Oedipus Machina transports the action to a vaguely eastern, otherworldly locale. em>Read more…

Deborah Klugman – Stage Raw

Among the reasons to appreciate Ron Sossi’s staging of playwright Ellen McLaughlin’s Oedipus – re-titled Oedipus Machina for the strange extraterrestrial-like edifice that dominates the set – is Joshua Wolfe Coleman’s portrayal of the well-meaning but clueless king. Read more…

Now running through July 26.

63 TRILLION at the Odyssey Theatre

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Terry Morgan  -  Stage Raw

John Bunzel’s new play is reminiscent of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, but more comedic in intent. The story takes place in the milieu of “wealth management” during a fictional financial catastrophe as the various characters attempt to screw each other over or profit from the chaos. Read more…

Steven Leigh Morris – LA Weekly

For a snapshot of our bifurcated city through the lens of our 99-seat theater, see John Bunzel’s money management farce 63 Trillion, presented by the New American Theatre at the Westside’s Odyssey Theatre, and then head east to Boyle Heights to watch Emmanuel Deleage and Lorenzo Alfredo’s earnest bio-drama An L.A. Journey: The Story of Lorenzo Alfredo, about an orphan child’s journey, without papers, from Guatemala to L.A. Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

Someday a play may come along to challenge the prevailing view that anyone who handles other people’s money for a living is a venal, soulless opportunist. John Bunzel’s “63 Trillion,in its world premiere guest-produced by New American Theatre at the Odyssey, is not that play. Read more…

 

Now running through June 7.

CORKTOWN 57 at the Odyssey Theatre

pHOTO BY eD kRIEGER

Photo by Ed Krieger

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

Corktown 57 unfolds entirely in the Irish-quarter grocery-shop basement of Frank Keating (John Ruby), who’s having difficulties with his wife (Natalie Britton, in a nicely textured performance). Read more...

David C. Nichols – LA Times

Family dynamics and political ire mix it up in “Corktown ‘57” at the Odyssey Theatre. Playwright John Fazakerley’s account of a volatile clan in Philadelphia’s Irish quarter owes more than a little to Eugene O’Neill and Sean O’Casey, but it has plenty of emotional and ideological fodder of its own. Read more…

Now running through May 3.

CORKTOWN 57 at the Odyssey Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger

Photo by Ed Krieger

Paul Birchall  – Stage Raw

“The whole world’s in a state of chassis!” said Jack Boyle, the iconic Irish lotus-eating blackguard of Juno and the Paycock, Sean O’Casey’s great drama about the tragic flaws of an Irish family. Read more…

Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

Corktown 57 unfolds entirely in the Irish-quarter grocery-shop basement of Frank Keating (John Ruby), who’s having difficulties with his wife (Natalie Britton, in a nicely textured performance). Read more…

Bob Verini -   Arts In LA

Though this John Fazakerley’s Irishmen-transplanted-to-America play runs slightly less than two hours, it lines up enough characters and story elements to populate an entire 13-episode season’s worth of TV melodrama. Read more…

 

Now running through May 3.

ANNA CHRISTIE at the Odyssey Theatre

Photo by DIego Barajas

Photo by DIego Barajas

Terry Morgan  -  Stage Raw

One of the pleasures of attending theater is witnessing the rebirth of a classic play through a vital new production. There’s something profoundly satisfying in realizing that the concerns of the past aren’t that different from our own; that art, when well done, resounds down the corridors of time like crisp, clear music. Read more…

Now running through March 8.