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Archive for Tarell Alvin McCraney

HEAD OF PASSES at the Mark Taper Forum

Photo by Craig Schwartz.

Photo by Craig Schwartz.

Frances Baum Nicholson –The Stage Struck Review

Every once in a while one comes across a performance which may outweigh the play it takes place in. In this case, a good play becomes greater because of one person who takes a playwright’s words and their own and their director’s understandings and makes of them something much more than the sum of those parts. This is Phylicia Rashad in “Head of Passes,” now open at the Mark Taper Forum.
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Jonas Schwartz -  TheaterMania

Throughout Act 1 of Tarell Alvin McCraney’s Head of Passes, now at the Mark Taper Forum, Phylicia Rashad plays a religious woman on her last legs who chooses her birthday to unravel family secrets. Nothing in that act prepares audiences for the awe-striking flow of passion that emits from the famous actor in Act 2 as she spews fury at God……..
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Deborah Klugman – LA Weekly

In Head of Passes, playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney strives to create a narrative of epic proportion, but with only moderate success. Directed by Tina Landau at the Mark Taper Forum, the play nonetheless is worth seeing for the questions it poses, the production’s finely-tuned ensemble, and the lead performance by Phylicia Rashad as a devout woman sorely tested by her God.
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Now running through October 22

 

CHOIR BOY at the Geffen Playhouse

Photo by Michael Lamont

Bob Verini -   Arts In LA

Tarell Alvin McCraney’s Choir Boy is a mess but all the same a bona fide crowd pleaser. Its characters are drawn with remarkable inconsistency, and they’re put through enough subplots (touched on, though never explored fully) for a play twice its two-hour length. What pulls it through is the passion of director Trip Cullman’s cast, as well as the potency of the theme that occupies more stage time than a dozen or so others: the power of song to unite and heal. Read more...

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Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

At first, Tarell Alvin McCraney’s study of five, black prep-school students (Jeremy Pope, Nicholas L. Ashe, Donovan Mitchell, Grantham Coleman and Caleb Eberhardt), along with their stern headmaster (Michael A.Shepperd) and a visiting white professor (Leonard Kelly-Young) from the Civil Rights era, might seem schematic. Read more…

 

Myron Meisel – The Hollywood Reporter

While few doubt the capacious talent of 33-year-old Tarell Alvin McCraney, on the evidence of his trilogy The Brother/Sister Plays, he could have been mistaken for an accessibly esoteric artist trafficking in Orisha myths and remote subcultures. Read more…

 

 

Now running through Oct. 26.

THE BROTHERS SIZE at the Fountain Theatre and DROP DEAD at NoHo Arts Center

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Steven Leigh Morris  – LA Weekly

Tarell Alvin McCraney’s tender, poetical drama The Brothers Size (Fountain Theatre) and Billy Van Zandt & Jane Milmore’s meta-theatrical farce Drop Dead! (presented by Theatre 68, at North Hollywood’s NoHo Arts Center) share one salient commonality: Each production has moments when the actors recite stage directions about their own characters. Tarell Alvin McCraney’s tender, poetical drama The Brothers Size (Fountain Theatre) and Billy Van Zandt & Jane Milmore’s meta-theatrical farce Drop Dead! (presented by Theatre 68, at North Hollywood’s NoHo Arts Center) share one salient commonality: Each production has moments when the actors recite stage directions about their own characters. Read more…

Myron Meisel – The Hollywood Reporter

Playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney boasts a rare talent: an utterly distinctive voice. He sounds like no one else, his cadences hearty and beautiful. I am in love with his voice, and in all likelihood you will feel the same way. For better, and sometimes less so, so be he. Read more…

Margaret Gray – LA Times

The Fountain Theatre follows up its award-winning 2012 production of Tarell Alvin McCraney’s “In the Red and Brown Water” with a vibrant incarnation of “The Brothers Size,” the second installment in McCraney’s acclaimed trilogy.      Read more…

 

Now running through July 27.

In the Red and Brown Water, Fountain Theatre

Photo by Ed Krieger.

 

In the Red and Brown Water by Tarell Alvin McCraney.

 

Bob Verini – ArtsInLA.com

It’s about time Tarell Alvin McCraney’s work was able to be seen in Los Angeles. The Brother/Sister Plays, his trilogy about indigenous backwoods Louisiana folk operating under strange and magical Yoruba and Caribbean influences, has been garnering raves on both sides of the Atlantic (he has served as a house playwright for the RSC), whether performed as a unit or, as here, one at a time with the debut of In the Red and Brown Water at the Fountain Theater. McCraney is black and gay, but his work occupies no narrow niche; it’s for and about everyone.  Read more…

 

Pauline Adamek – ArtsBeatLA

Tarell Alvin McCraney’s poetic drama In the Red and Brown Water, now playing at The Fountain Theatre, has been extended for an additional eight weeks through to the end of February in honor of Black History Month. This play is the second part of a trilogy entitled ‘The Brother/Sister Plays.’ In this two-acter McCraney draws on West African mythology and transplants it to an urban contemporary setting to tell the tale of Oya (Diarra Kilpatrick) a young woman with vast potential as a long-distance runner. But the high-school track star puts her college dreams on hold to care for her aged and sickly mother Mama Mojo (Peggy A. Blow) – a decision that sows the seeds of disappointment throughout the rest of her life.  Read more…